Here’s another hand-to-the-forehead discovery about a native of Colorado Springs who went on to become an amazing artist: Rex Ray (neé Michael Patterson) was born in 1956 and grew up in Colorado Springs. Like so many before and since, he left in his teens and moved straight to San Francisco, spent his 20s and 30s doing graphic design for record labels, for which he became quite famous (Bowie, The Rolling Stones, etc.). Then one day he realized he decided he wanted to do whatever he wanted to do and began to make design-y collages from magazines. And so began his second career doing giant painting/collage/designs that charm the eye even as they persistently defy a defined medium.

Here are a couple of videos about Ray, the second of which is from a documentary titled “How to Make a Rex Ray,” which you can purchase HERE.

Rex Ray from Post & Grant on Vimeo.

Note to the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center: Please get a Rex Ray show! Thanks.

 

7 Responses to Artist Rex Ray: Native Son

  1. Mary Ellen Davis says:

    What an amazing body of work–and a great story! Thanks for bringing this to us.

  2. mike procell says:

    I couldn’t help but notice the statue of Jesus on his shelf.

  3. Jennifer Dunaway says:

    I second the motion to get a Rex Ray show here, FAC!

  4. Kathye Pebley says:

    I would love to see Rex Ray again.

  5. Anne Lennox says:

    So, Noel, when will the FAC have the Rex Ray show?
    Annie

  6. Daisy McConnell says:

    Holy moly!!! I had no idea, his work is fantastic. Thanks BS!

  7. kay johnson says:

    Got a book on his years ago and was surprised to see he went to UCCS. Lots of talent that CS does not shout about for some reason- Rex Ray, Louis Cicotello, Senga Nengudi, Margaret Kilgallen, Gus Lee, Frank Waters, Floyd Tunson, Dave Mason, even Tesla. Lots to shout about! Would be wonderful to be known as the town these extremely creative
    folks live/have lived in instead of the home of political/religious fanatic types.

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