The World War II Amache Japanese Internment Camp in southeastern Colorado is the subject of an exhibit at The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs opening today. As KRCC’s Eliza Densmore reports, the exhibit presents a dark piece of Colorado history.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The exhibit pairs archaeological remains with oral history from those associated with the internment camp. Artifacts include marbles, hair barrettes, and Japanese sake bottles. DU Associate Professor of Anthropology Bonnie Clark helped create the exhibit. Clark says the goal is to create a dialogue and encourage people to visit the site in southern Colorado.

“This larger story that we don’t often talk about when in the US we got things wrong. And particularly I think our history, rightly so, of World War II, is often about victory and about going in and really stopping oppressive regimes abroad but there’s also some things that happened at home that were sort of counter to that.”

At capacity, the camp housed over 7,500 people during the war. Two-thirds of them were American citizens. The exhibit’s a collaboration among faculties at UCCS and DU and was created by DU students.


The exhibit will take place at the Heller Center for the Arts and Humanities at UCCS October 15th-November 5th.

 

Comments are closed.

News

AP
October 24, 2017 | NPR · Under pressure from competitors, the race committee said the 30-year-old musher is under suspicion of giving his dogs the drug tamadol in this year’s race. Seavey has denied any wrongdoing.
 

for NPR
October 23, 2017 | NPR · We don’t always do what we’re supposed to. We don’t save enough for retirement. We order dessert when we’re dieting. In other words we misbehave. Nobel Prize winning economist Richard Thaler asks why.
 

Getty Images for Hollywood Reporter
October 23, 2017 | NPR · The Murdoch family decided to keep host Bill O’Reilly on the air even after pledging to clean house at Fox News over a larger sexual harassment scandal.
 

Arts & Life

October 23, 2017 | NPR · NPR’s Robert Siegel talks with John Hodgman about his new book Vacationland: True Stories from Painful Beaches. This time Hodgman isn’t writing about nonsensical histories, but his life.
 

Getty Images
October 23, 2017 | NPR · Official documents say the Nobel laureate died of prostate cancer in 1973. But 16 forensics experts have unanimously concluded that isn’t true, stoking suspicions again that he was actually poisoned.
 

Getty Images
October 23, 2017 | FA · “The reality is that Eric Garner died at the hands of a police force and a criminal justice system that were designed entirely by white people, for the most part,” says journalist Matt Taibbi.
 

Music

Getty Images
October 23, 2017 | NPR · Montreal police ticketed Taoufik Moalla for screaming in public. But Moalla says he was doing nothing more than singing along to C+C Music Factory’s “Gonna Make You Sweat (Everybody Dance Now).”
 

Redferns/Getty Images
October 23, 2017 | NPR · Ain co-founded Hellhammer and Celtic Frost with guitarist Tom Warrior, extreme metal bands that splayed shades of black across three decades.
 

Courtesy of Black Editions
October 23, 2017 | NPR · In 1991, the Tokyo Flashback comp introduced the world to Japanese psychedelic music. Experience the whammy-bar wizardry of White Heaven’s “Blind Promise” from a new reissue.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab