The World War II Amache Japanese Internment Camp in southeastern Colorado is the subject of an exhibit at The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs opening today. As KRCC’s Eliza Densmore reports, the exhibit presents a dark piece of Colorado history.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The exhibit pairs archaeological remains with oral history from those associated with the internment camp. Artifacts include marbles, hair barrettes, and Japanese sake bottles. DU Associate Professor of Anthropology Bonnie Clark helped create the exhibit. Clark says the goal is to create a dialogue and encourage people to visit the site in southern Colorado.

“This larger story that we don’t often talk about when in the US we got things wrong. And particularly I think our history, rightly so, of World War II, is often about victory and about going in and really stopping oppressive regimes abroad but there’s also some things that happened at home that were sort of counter to that.”

At capacity, the camp housed over 7,500 people during the war. Two-thirds of them were American citizens. The exhibit’s a collaboration among faculties at UCCS and DU and was created by DU students.


The exhibit will take place at the Heller Center for the Arts and Humanities at UCCS October 15th-November 5th.

 

Comments are closed.

News

December 17, 2014 | NPR · The recent attack on Sony Pictures’ computer network that resulted in a flood of confidential data has its origins in North Korea, U.S. intelligence officials say.
 

Satanic Temple
December 17, 2014 | NPR · The situation has brought controversy — and energized Christians who realized that a planned Nativity scene was in danger of being canceled.
 

AFP/Getty Images
December 17, 2014 | NPR · For the Japanese, Christmastime means sponge cake. But a nationwide butter shortage has lead to mandatory butter rationing, forcing cake bakers to seek out substitutes.
 

Arts & Life

Universal Pictures
December 17, 2014 | NPR · Louis Zamperini was an Olympian before he enlisted in World War II and became a prisoner of war. Jolie says he told her to “make a film that reminds people that they have greatness inside themselves.”
 

Sony Pictures Entertainment
December 17, 2014 | NPR · As an African-American Annie arrives on movie screens, critic Bob Mondello looks at other cross-cultural reinventions, from Pearl Bailey’s Dolly to the Americanization of Carmen as Carmen Jones.
 

December 17, 2014 | NPR · In Gay Berlin, Robert Beachy describes the rise of a gay subculture in the 1920s and ’30s, how it contributed to our understanding of gay identity and how it was eradicated by the Nazis.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
December 17, 2014 | WXPN · Hailu Mergia, a keyboard player and Ethiopian music star who lives in the U.S., will get you anywhere you need to go in our nation’s capital.
 

Courtesy of the artist
December 17, 2014 | NPR · The World Cafe host’s favorite albums from this year abide by his mantra: they put good songs first, and present them simply and authentically.
 

Courtesy of the artists
December 17, 2014 | NPR · The results are in! St. Vincent’s self-titled album was by far the most popular record in our listener poll for the best music of 2014. On this week’s show, we count down the Top 25.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab