The US Supreme Court will not hear an appeal challenging the federal roadless rule that bans mining, logging and other commercial development from some of the country’s most prized forests. KUNC’s Kirk Siegler reports the action announced yesterday is being praised by conservation groups and criticized by the mining industry.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The Colorado Mining Association joined with the State of Wyoming in asking the high court to consider their appeal of a 10th Circuit ruling last year that upholds the 2001 Roadless Rule. The issue has been at the heart of a see-saw legal battle ever since President Clinton enacted it before leaving office. Jane Danowitz hopes Monday’s Supreme Court action is a signal that the issue is finally settled. She’s director of public lands for the Pew Environment Group.

“Without the Roadless Area Conservation Rule, America’s last undeveloped national forests could be imperiled by logging, mining and other industrial activities.”

Conservation groups have long fought to keep the national rule intact, and many also fought Colorado’s state-specific Roadless Rule which has just been finalized. Colorado opted to write its OWN plan which allows for some development into previously protected forests, namely for coal mine expansions.

“That is the silver lining in this.”

Stuart Sanderson, president of the Colorado Mining Association, says Colorado’s Roadless Rule will allow coal mining to continue to flourish at least in this state. The CMA and the state of Wyoming argued that the national roadless rule created de-facto wilderness without the consent of Congress.

 

Comments are closed.

News

Getty Images
April 23, 2017 | NPR · President Trump plays a lot of golf. But not nearly as much as Woodrow Wilson.
 

April 23, 2017 | NPR · A tiny, hard-to-find storefront in Brooklyn is home to the darkly whimsical world of a most unusual candy maker. Eugene J. studied chemical engineering before opening an experimental candy shop.
 

Dani Fresh for WHYY
April 23, 2017 | NwsWrks · Digesters convert livestock manure into electricity. Farmers can use it to power their operations or even sell some back to the grid. But some have found the technology too pricey to maintain.
 

Arts & Life

NPR
April 23, 2017 | NPR · The author behind the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants series writes from experience — her parents divorced when she was young, and she says the divisions remain “to this day.”
 

April 23, 2017 | NPR · A tiny, hard-to-find storefront in Brooklyn is home to the darkly whimsical world of a most unusual candy maker. Eugene J. studied chemical engineering before opening an experimental candy shop.
 

Angie Wang for NPR
April 23, 2017 | NPR · After an incorrect dose of a chemotherapy drug for Crohn’s disease caused Anne Webster’s bone marrow to shut down, she decided that, if she survived, she’d write about her experience.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
April 23, 2017 | NPR · On his new album, Parking Lot Symphony, Troy Andrews keeps New Orleans’ brass-band sound up-to-date. Thanks to a new generation of musicians, he says, “the future of the music is in good hands.”
 

Screenshot by NPR
April 23, 2017 | NPR · Mona Haydar calls her music “resistance music” because it celebrates diversity and calls for women to be “unapologetic about who they are.”
 

Getty Images
April 22, 2017 | NPR · As a teenager, the Sleater-Kinney guitarist’s local record shop, Rubato Records, became the site of an awakening. “I felt like I had discovered a treasure chest,” she says, “and I dove in.”
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab