The US Supreme Court will not hear an appeal challenging the federal roadless rule that bans mining, logging and other commercial development from some of the country’s most prized forests. KUNC’s Kirk Siegler reports the action announced yesterday is being praised by conservation groups and criticized by the mining industry.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The Colorado Mining Association joined with the State of Wyoming in asking the high court to consider their appeal of a 10th Circuit ruling last year that upholds the 2001 Roadless Rule. The issue has been at the heart of a see-saw legal battle ever since President Clinton enacted it before leaving office. Jane Danowitz hopes Monday’s Supreme Court action is a signal that the issue is finally settled. She’s director of public lands for the Pew Environment Group.

“Without the Roadless Area Conservation Rule, America’s last undeveloped national forests could be imperiled by logging, mining and other industrial activities.”

Conservation groups have long fought to keep the national rule intact, and many also fought Colorado’s state-specific Roadless Rule which has just been finalized. Colorado opted to write its OWN plan which allows for some development into previously protected forests, namely for coal mine expansions.

“That is the silver lining in this.”

Stuart Sanderson, president of the Colorado Mining Association, says Colorado’s Roadless Rule will allow coal mining to continue to flourish at least in this state. The CMA and the state of Wyoming argued that the national roadless rule created de-facto wilderness without the consent of Congress.


Comments are closed.


October 4, 2015 | NPR · A hospital was hit while U.S. forces were conducting an airstrike in the Afghan city; the aid group says 22 people were killed. NATO has said that it will conduct an investigation into the attack.

October 4, 2015 | NPR · The U.S. and NATO have spent years in Kunduz, Afghanistan, building communities to keep insurgents out. Two who were there 12 years ago describe how it felt this week when the Taliban retook the city.

October 4, 2015 | NPR · Utah Republican Rep. Jason Chaffetz says he’s a better choice for the job than Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

Arts & Life

October 4, 2015 | NPR · Theater critic Michael Riedel dishes some juicy backstage anecdotes in his new book about Broadway’s Shubert Organization, but fails to bring its deal-makers and their troubles to convincing life.

October 4, 2015 | NPR · Fear The Walking Dead is telling a story not often explored on prime-time television: generational rifts over the violence that immigrant parents have experienced.

Courtesy of the Kerlan Collection
October 4, 2015 | NPR · Once a doctor’s hobby, the Kerlan Collection is now one of the world’s great collections of children’s literature. Over 100,000 books offer visitors a chance to see the writer’s process — for free.


Courtesy of the artist
October 4, 2015 | NPR · A one-time pop sensation, the singer and composer made a deft pivot to theater with his Tony-winning music for Spring Awakening. These days, he’s exploring the electronic music of his youth.

October 3, 2015 | NPR · Tom Waits lays down his belief in mole democracy and New York City surrealism in a recently unearthed, freshly animated interview on PBS.

Important Records
October 3, 2015 | NPR · Jacobs’ achievements are almost too diverse to list: a humorist, record producer, sound designer and radio host, he achieved little fame but was a catalyst for giant steps in the worlds he touched.

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac