Photographer Trevor Paglen has made a galactic Noah’s Ark of images on a gold-encased silicon disc that will be launched into space. The project is intended to document our culture of “ancient aliens” so that when future aliens find it in a billion years they’ll have some idea about our civilizaion and culture. For some reason Paglen decided not to include captions. Interesting, we think, all the images make us seem like aliens on this planet, which, perhaps we are.

A selection of 17 of the 100 images is available to view in a slide show at Slate.com HERE. Included is a photograph taken during the construction of the Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Base inside Cheyenne Mountain (often mistakenly called NORAD) that we also featured in a slide show of images HERE a few years ago. To see all 100 images, of course, you’ll have to buy the book.

Surely the images will make you scratch your head (Paglen’s essay on how he conceived this project may shed some light on his choices HERE, and certainly account for why the images he chose seem so “alien”). What images would you include? What images of the Pikes Peak Region would best represent us to the aliens of the future? We wonder!

 

One Response to Image from Colorado Springs Included in 100 “Last Pictures”

  1. hannah says:

    Of course no captions because any alien lifeforms that find it billions of years hence would not be able to understand out of context. Here is an interesting interview with Paglen. He found the project to be more a commentary on undertaking such projects, rather than having value as an archive.

    http://www.e-flux.com/journal/the-last-pictures-interview-with-trevor-paglen/

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