CSP Lt. Adrian Vasquez

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The law enforcement team looking into the cause of this summer’s Waldo Canyon Fire says the blaze was human-caused. Seven different federal and local agencies are investigating the devastating fire that began in June. Colorado Springs Police Lieutenant Adrian Vasquez heads the team. He says there’s no person of interest yet.

“We know that the cause was human caused. Right now, we do not know if it was intentional, or if it was accidental, so that is still part of the ongoing investigation.”

Vasquez says the point of origin is within three miles of the Waldo Canyon Trailhead off Highway 24 west of Colorado Springs. He’s asking people with any possible information to call Crime Stoppers.

“There really continues to be a lot of unanswered questions. We continue our investigation, and we still don’t have all of our answers.”

The blaze burned nearly 350 homes and killed two. At its height, over 30,000 people were evacuated from the Pikes Peak Region.


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