A recent report shows Colorado on track to more than double its obesity rate within 20 years. That could mean billions of dollars more in health care costs unless the trend begins to reverse. Aspen Public Radio‘s Luke Runyon reports.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

One out of every five adults in Colorado is obese now. Which doesn’t sound great, but still gives the state the bragging right as the leanest in the country.

“To put it in perspective though, even that rate, which is the lowest in the country, would¿ve been the highest in country just 20 years ago.”

Rich Hamburg is with the advocacy group Trust for America’s Health, which compiled the report. He says even though Colorado is doing better compared to other states, it’s on a trajectory to more than double the percentage of obese people by 2030, pushing Colorado closer to the pack of more obese states.

“Colorado’s rate seems to be rising a bit faster. That might be a factor coming from being the lowest possible rate.”

Hamburg says just a slight dip in body fat across the population could save more than 10 billion dollars in health care costs down the line.

State and federal officials have yet to find a singular solution to the crisis. The Colorado Health Institute’s Sara Shmitt says to reverse the trend, there’s been a large emphasis on children and schools.

“Because we do know that children that are overweight or obese are more likely to be overweight or obese as adults.”

Shmitt says some programs have shown success. Changes to school lunch menus have slowed weight gain in certain schools, and increased access to walking and biking trails has done the same in neighborhoods.

 

Comments are closed.

News

NPR
May 24, 2018 | NPR · There are many ways young children encounter stories. A new study finds a “Goldilocks effect,” where a cartoon may be “too hot” and audiobooks “too cold” for learning readers.
 

AP
May 24, 2018 | NPR · North Korea’s vice foreign minister calls remarks made by Vice President Pence “ignorant and stupid” and said she was prepared to recommend to Kim Jong Un to “reconsider” the summit.
 

AP
May 24, 2018 | NPR · His approval numbers, the economy — even the Russia probe — could all help Trump boost the GOP. But some in the White House worry Republicans in Congress don’t understand the headwinds 2018 brings.
 

Arts & Life

May 23, 2018 | NPR · Philip Roth talked with former All Things Considered host Robert Siegel many times over the years. Here Roth discusses some of his thoughts on his writing process. Roth died Tuesday at 85.
 

Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures
May 23, 2018 | NPR · A new documentary, The Gospel According to André, digs into the colorful life of former Vogue fashion editor, French history expert and noted caftan enthusiast André Leon Talley.
 

AP
May 23, 2018 | FA · The influential novelist won almost every major literary award, but still found the writing process was full of discovery. “Each and every sentence is a revelation,” he said. Roth died Tuesday at 85.
 

Music

May 24, 2018 | NPR · A quarter-century into Case’s career, her words still feel intensely personal and utterly oblique, as if she’s whispering her darkest secrets in Sanskrit.
 

May 24, 2018 | NPR · On her sophomore release The Future and The Past, the heartbreak of Prass’ 2015 self-titled debut is still there in spades, but the narrative — as well as the music itself — is somehow grander yet.
 

Courtesy of the artist
May 24, 2018 | NPR · On her second album, the gospel and soul singer makes temperate use of dramatic gestures.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab