Of all the hidden treasures we try to bring you on The Big Something, few rate as highly as the reclusive local artist Floyd Tunson. A long-time art teacher at Palmer High School, Tunson has been “retired” for over a decade during which time he has devoted himself full-time to his first love. Now the subject of a 40-year career retrospective set to open at The Fine Arts Center on October 27, 2012, we stopped by Tunson’s studio recently to bring you this profile and peek inside his spectacular studio.

(The audio in this slide show was featured in the Septempber 2012 edition of Western Skies, KRCC’s monthly news magazine.)


13 Responses to Studio Visit: In the Hotbed of Nothingness with Floyd Tunson

  1. Jeanie says:

    What a wonderful report. Thank you so much for this information. I have wondered for years what he was up to and now I am delighted to see that he continues to create!
    Oh! and by the way Floyd, thanks so much for the terrific looking geranimes.

  2. Cole says:

    It was a good balance to feature an artist who derives clarity from limiting cultural input after hearing about so much artistic interaction in the rest of the Western Skies broadcast. Though I wonder if Thompson counts the FAC, which will be hosting his exhibition, as part of this “Hotbed of Nothingness.” I find the area to be very culturally lively, and the rest of the segments reveal that fact. I suppose if you aren’t looking at something, it seems as though it isn’t there.

    • Noel Black says:

      Cole, you may have missed the fact that, right after the “hotbed of nothingness” quote he does make a broad exception for the FAC and fellow local artists. It’s a feeling, I think, more than an absolute truth as I understood it. – Noel

      • cole says:

        I didn’t miss it, I felt that it was an intentional editing decision to provide contrast. I do feel, however, that it contradicts the point you have chosen to highlight, as does the rest of the Western Skies segment.

      • cole says:

        His feeling sounds like it was important to his creative process, and that, I think, is why it becomes an important statement. I see artists and the community as intertwined, and not separate, so my initial response was a bit petulant. I have felt this way too, however. That the arts have to fight for legitimacy and relevance in our community. I believe that is true for America as a whole, with a fistful of exceptions.

  3. Escapee from Hotbed d'Nada says:

    LOL… I guess if you’re not reading or listening you can’t SEE that the artists name is TUNSON.

  4. Mary Ellen Davis says:

    Since when do artists have to worry about whether they hurt our feelings?

    • Candy Eade says:

      Since Facebook emerged & reformatted cultural discourse as a manic & uncritical celebration of positive thinking. & a local artist is far more capable of objectively accessing the arts scene than, say, a gallery owner with a commercial interest in boosterism.

    • cole says:

      I don’t object to his perspective Mary Ellen, but I might have gotten my feelings hurt, though I don’t think that’s anyones problem. I was am interested in the contrast between this extracted quote and the rest of the broadcast. I don’t mind it, I’m interested in teasing out the thoughts on how and in what ways this community is, or isn’t, a hotbed of nothingness. There are good arguments for it being one, I’m sure. I’ll have to see his show, I wonder if his work asks the same questions in any way, or if this perspective has more to do with his process. I value artwork made by people who are highly interactive with their community, and those who need to be isolated to toil and create. I think artists can play a valuable role in creating, but also criticizing their environments.

  5. phillip b. vallejo says:

    Floyd Tunson ,draws. paints, constructs,designs and produces more ART, than all the artists in Colorado Springs, Manitou. Maybe more than in Colorado and in the U.S.A. He dosen’t care about what people think about it. it’s his passion,His vision about what he feels about, in the time and space. he created it.. 40 Fucking years is along time, for any passion, about, anything! and I know for a fact! His show At the FAC. It’s just the begining for this artist. It’s time to suport and invest in the real art of local art. before we can’t afford it………just saying.

  6. delia says:

    what a pleasure to listen to the insightful visit with the gifted Mr Tunson surely a significant commentary on the assets to our environment here—-
    thank you floyd for your gift to the world
    ron and i enjoyed your wisdom Saturday

  7. Lee says:

    And I know more than one student who was transformed by being in Floyd’s presence at Palmer High….. there is legacy there as well..

  8. Heidi Marshall-Wagner says:

    Tunson was my teacher a very long time ago, and I never forgot what true art is; he and his fellow teacher Don Green shook up a pretty boring and conventional city, made students stand up and listen, and more importantly LOOK at what great art could be. We (his students) were very lucky to have such a role model. Great show, from a great artist.
    HM Wagner People who read this message – please check your spelling, your excitement is delightful, but really even texting should follow some guidelines.


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