Republican Vice Presidential Nominee Paul Ryan spent yesterday trying to win over Colorado voters. He started in Fort Collins in the morning, and finished in Colorado Springs in the late afternoon. KRCC’s Andrea Chalfin reports.

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Thousands of supporters streamed into America the Beautiful Park in downtown Colorado Springs to hear Ryan. The GOP Vice Presidential nominee spoke for about 20 minutes, blasting President Barack Obama’s economic and energy policies. Ryan also blamed the president for potential military cuts.

“These devastating defense cuts that he is promising not only undermine our peace, not only undermine our security, they compromise jobs right here.”

Rally attendee Scott Saack said he found Ryan’s speech informative.

“He kind of filled in a few details, maybe not everything we were looking for, because we got a lot of whirl, but we are not going to be able to deal from a position of strength without being strong.”

Journalistic fact-checker Politifact.com says blaming Mr. Obama for the cuts is half true. The possible defense cuts, and other cuts, known as sequestration, are set to go into effect next year. That’s if lawmakers can’t agree on how to reduce the deficit.

 

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