Residents affected by the Waldo Canyon Fire have the chance to ask questions this evening to a panel of guests about the rebuilding process. KRCC’s Katherine-Claire O’Connor reports.

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Speakers include the City Planning Commission, the Colorado Springs Fire Department, and mortgage specialists. John Cassiani is the President of the non-profit Housing and Building Association, which is hosting the discussion. He says they’ve received hundreds of calls from homeowners asking all kinds of questions about cleanup and rebuilding steps. Cassiani says even what remains might need to be replaced.

“Again with the heat of the fire a lot of the time it sucks the moisture out of the foundations. Which causes the foundations in years to come to crumble and you don’t want to use it, you want to tear it out, you want to put a new foundation in, and you have to go to the insurance to make sure they will cover the foundation removal. So there is a lot of those kind of criteria.”

Cassiani says some residents have already submitted building permits, and tonight’s meeting aims to answer these types of questions. It starts at 6 and takes place at the Freedom Financial Services Expo Center.

 

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