Interview with Chuck Snow about the Taylor Barn

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If you’ve ever driven through the intersection at Templeton Gap and Fillmore in Colorado Springs, then you probably remember the inspirational murals and mules that lived at the Taylor Barn. Today on the Big Something Radio Program, Noel Black interviews local musician and self-described curmudgeon Chuck Snow about his recent efforts to help save the barn.

If you have memories of the Taylor Barn please share them in the comments or find the “Save the Barn” page on Facebook. You can also email us photos to thebigsomething@krcc.org. Thanks!

 

12 Responses to Save the,… er, Remember the Barn!

  1. Susan Rissman says:

    Love the barn!! Always have been so inspired by the beauty of the murals as well as the ever brilliant words of wisdom…hmmm, can’t recall a particular favorite but remember how sad I felt to see the last one…”Vaya con Dios…”

  2. Bob Carnein says:

    Thanks for explaining something I often wondered about. In many ways, the barn was transitory from the time the first painting was changed to the second. Without the Taylors’ presence, there isn’t much to save. Really, the pictures tell a far more complete story than the physical building..

  3. B. Casados says:

    Thanks for this story and the photos! I have fond memories of admiring the animals, murals and sayings, on my regular drives to UCCS, starting in 1975.

  4. Jennifer says:

    Such a great interview. The barn is a fantastic topic for TBS– it really is a great memory I have from my childhood. Always such a mystery.

  5. Nancy says:

    I live a few blocks away from the “donkey barn,” a true oasis – and novelty – among the concrete and the city’s only triple-left-turn lanes. We looked forward to the sayings and loved hearing the braying of the donkeys. How sad it couldn’t be saved. Colorado Springs does not need another medical office building.

  6. Al B. Darned says:

    I dont get what the big deal is? A family decides to sell its own property. Ok? And this dude is angry? Hahaha, cry me a river “mr snow,” let a family sell its property without interference from some random do-gooder or whatever you think you are here.

    • Chuck Snow says:

      Dear Al, no one was angry or trying to interfere with the family selling the property. Just because you can comment, doesn’t mean you should.

  7. hjwithers says:

    Thanks, Noel for compiling the photos and the interview. I can now check off a To Do list item I had made, after reading the barn had been taken down. You are a true historian to seek out the little things that are part of the KRCC community and then share them with everyone. If I knew of an award for this historical research you do, I would nominate you for it.

  8. Nancy Wilsted says:

    The Chief. The Ute. They’re more than property, and what a shame to lose our history and our idiosyncrasies. They give our lives and our community depth. Once these things are gone, there is no having them back, except in memory and photos. This city shall ever grieve for the Burns Theatre.

  9. Jacy Doumas says:

    “The spirit of the community is how we preserve our antiquities,” sweetly said! Our children attended Holy Trinity ‘Little School’ located in the nearby neighborhood. Each morning we passes the barn and donkey brought a little joy to our day. Of course
    It’s private propery and they are free to do what they wish with it. But sharing these types of stories on The Big Something allows our community to feel a little connected by a shared memory and that is welcome in a community that can otherwise feel diconncted by the physical sprawl and disparate viewpoints we live with. It’s like the Starr Kempf home. Sure, it’s privately owned but it’s a popular place to bring visitors and we have shared memories of that arists’ life and work.
    So, thank you! I’ve got sweet memories of The Taylor Barn on my mind now.

  10. Tracy Morgan says:

    “The spirit of the community is how we preserve our antiquities,” an amazing simple, straightforward, very true statement. Thank you Chuck Snow. Great interview and insight. Hope that we all remember that antiquities includes people sometimes too…..not just places and things.

  11. Hank Scarangella says:

    I passed the barn everyday on the way home from work. All the stresses and strains of the day disappeared as I slowed to read the message and just enjoy the selfless gift. I miss the barn.

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