I’ve had a thing for alleys since I was little. Most of my friends lived along four blocks in the old North End of Colorado Springs that were all connected by an alley through which we had a great deal of freedom to roam. Without the speeding cars on Nevada Avenue and most adults, it was a like secret passageway lined with lilacs, weeds, car carcasses and barking dogs that allowed us to move swiftly and stealthily between our respective homes to play and, later, drink our parents’ liquor and make out. There’s still an other-worldliness and anonymity about alleys that’s magical.

 

4 Responses to Planet Alley Revisited

  1. susan leek says:

    I absolutely love this piece. I have always loved alleys too and so did my kids. I grew up in the mountains and alleys are one of the good things about cities.

  2. joyce cheney says:

    Great fun. Thanks. Alleys are wonderful spaces. You can walk down an alley and experience others’ living spaces via sight, sound and smell. No one notices you except the dogs. In St. Louis, MO allies, lots of goods are exchanged. Leave the old chair/lumber/clothing etc out and someone will come by and pick it up.
    Post Apocalyptic BBQ – good name for a band.
    And the Rolling Stones tongue was great – careful paint of the tongue – faded, peeling paint on the rest of the garage.

  3. Sue Grise says:

    Delighted to find someone who shares my love affair with alleys. I live and walk downtown, and I know where there’s an ancient hewn-log stable off Shook’s Run Park and where people hauled off the old octagonal tuberculosis huts and turned them into gazebos or sheds or home additions. People’s front yards are their public face, but their back yards are how they really live.

  4. Karl says:

    I’ve always traveled down alleys as a kid and now as a adult they are very cool to get a glimps of peoples lives and there is neat stuff to see and find.

News

Arts & Life

Music

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab