Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

More residents of the Mountain Shadows community are now allowed back into their homes. Colorado Springs Utilities, the Police Department and Office of Emergency Management have reopened streets including Ashton Park Place, Chambrey Court, Darien Way, and Rossmere Street between Ashton Park Place and Courtney Drive as of 5:00. A full list is available online at KRCC.org. Also, residents of areas still closed will have access with insurance adjusters tomorrow from 9 until 4. Check-in is at the Verizon Building.


Officials are reminding people that the area still has risk and some areas are still considered unsafe. There’s a meeting tomorrow night at 7 at Centennial Hall to address flash-flooding concerns. Current conditions mean hillsides once protected by plant life are now at risk for debris flow and flooding. Officials strongly encourage residents to look into flood insurance if they don’t have it already. US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said yesterday there’s a 30-day waiting period from the time insurance is purchased to the time it takes effect.

“It’s very important for people consider that right now, because if something were to occur within the next 30 days, there would not be coverage. So the sooner folks access flood insurance, the sooner they can go through that 30 day period and the more confident they can be that if this event gets complicated by a flood, that they’ll have additional protection and assistance.”

Colorado Springs and El Paso County officials are reminding residents of the burn ban in effect across the area. No fireworks are allowed, and charcoal grills are also prohibited.

 

Comments are closed.

News

Courtesy of University of Pittsburgh
March 1, 2015 | WESA · The groundbreaking ambulance service was created in the 1960s as the city struggled with racial tensions and poor medical transport. It trained African-American men to provide crucial emergency care.
 

Courtesy Julissa Arce
March 1, 2015 | NPR · Julissa Arce was a stellar student and an even better financial analyst, but she was scared to go to work every day. “Maybe today’s the day someone’s going to find out,” she feared.
 

Courtesy of Alex Tran
March 1, 2015 | NPR · He’s an epidemiologist. She’s a nurse. And both of them felt compelled to head off to West Africa to battle the virus.
 

Arts & Life

Paramount Pictures
March 1, 2015 | NPR · The man behind the look of Selma and A Most Violent Year talks about depicting violence, participating in history and being a black cinematographer in Hollywood.
 

AFP/Getty Images
March 1, 2015 | NPR · In his novel She Will Build Him a City, Raj Kamal Jha weaves the reality he sees as a journalist in New Delhi — where many gravitate looking for a better future — into a fictional, magical world.
 

Wikipedia
March 1, 2015 | NPR · One of rock music’s most loved, feared and prolific scribes, the 72-year-old Christgau says he knew early on that he liked criticism better than journalism: “I didn’t want to get into people’s faces.”
 

Music

Courtesy of Tricia Williams
March 1, 2015 | NPR · Diane Downs teaches music to the Louisville Leopard Percussionists in Kentucky. She says she hopes the kids feel like rock stars now that a video of their Led Zeppelin medley went viral on YouTube.
 

Wikipedia
March 1, 2015 | NPR · One of rock music’s most loved, feared and prolific scribes, the 72-year-old Christgau says he knew early on that he liked criticism better than journalism: “I didn’t want to get into people’s faces.”
 

Courtesy of the artist
March 1, 2015 | NPR · This month’s selections include a youngster from Montreal, a veteran from Chicago, warehouse techno from Paris, a visionary from London, and footwork from Michael Jackson’s hometown of Gary, Indiana.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab