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The Burned Area Emergency Response, or BAER, team held a closed briefing with other regional and federal groups today to talk about flooding potentials in the Waldo Canyon burn area while agencies continue to work on mitigation solutions and ask for patience.

Jonas Feinstein with the Natural Resources Conservation Service also says residents should be remain vigilant and pay close attention to the weather.

“We don’t want people to get complacent, and we don’t want to think that because the storm is six miles away that it’s not having an impact, won’t ultimately have an impact downstream.”

Feinstein says the danger can come even when water isn’t readily visible.

“In some instances, when you start to see that trickle of water coming down this drainage that you haven’t seen trickling for decades, it may be too late.”

In times of flash flood warnings, officials remind people to relocate to higher ground, and to remember “Uno,” which stands for Up, not Out. They also say no one should attempt to walk across flowing water or drive through flooded waterways.


A lizard is on the loose in Teller County. A release from the Teller County Sheriff’s office says a reverse 911 call was placed to residents of Woodland West, Westwood Lakes, and Rosewood Hills subdivisions just before noon this morning to warn them of a six-foot, 25-pound Nile Monitor lizard that had escaped from its owner. It’s possible the lizard could become aggressive, so officials say residents should closely monitor pets and children. Authorities are asking anyone who sees the lizard to call the Sheriff’s office at 719-687-9652.

 

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