Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The Colorado Attorney General’s office is expected to file its arguments against a lawsuit challenging how the Legislature funds schools in a case that’s being heard by the state Supreme Court later this year. Today is the deadline for government attorneys to file their legal brief. A Denver District judge ruled last year the state’s educational funding system is “irrational and inadequate.” The lawsuit argues the state’s education funding formula is unconstitutional and leaves students in poor districts at a disadvantage. Government officials argue education funding has grown during the last 20 years and that the state budget would be crippled if Colorado loses the lawsuit.


Forest officials are reminding people that the land within the burn area of the Waldo Canyon Fire is closed indefinitely. Fire information officer Dawn Sanchez says they’ve been seeing a steady stream of people looking to gain access to the area, but even if one doesn’t see a sign or a roadblock, the area is still closed.

“We do have a lot of areas in this fire that were pretty intensely burned. Those areas, they’re gonna continue to have some flash flood, some erosion issues in there, and not only that, we have some snag issues as well. We have fire weakened, damaged trees that are going to continue to come down. They can come down at any time. They can come down when there’s light winds, they can come down when there’s heavy winds. They can uproot, they can just snap off. It’s very dangerous for people to be in there right now.”

Sanchez says crews work daily to take down weakened trees, and they’re constantly reevaluating conditions. The Incident Commander also flies over the entire fire area every day to look at regions that are still smoking, and gauge the effects of any rain events.

Updated map of closed areas can be found here, effective July 19th.

 

Comments are closed.

News

Getty Images
June 25, 2016 | NPR · Cunningham worked at the Times for almost 40 years, capturing the fashion trends of the day with a timeless eye.
 

June 25, 2016 | NPR · All Things Considered is thinking about British songs that reflect people’s sentiments in the U.K. We picked some; if you can think of better songs to explain Brexit, tweet us @npratc #BrexitMix.
 

June 25, 2016 | NPR · Composer and keyboardist Bernie Worrell played funk, soul, and broke genres as a founding member of Parliament-Funkadelic and a performer with Talking Heads. Worrell died Friday at the age of 72.
 

Arts & Life

Getty Images
June 25, 2016 | NPR · Cunningham worked at the Times for almost 40 years, capturing the fashion trends of the day with a timeless eye.
 

Getty Images
June 25, 2016 | NPR · Scientists say they’ve figured out how to reduce the fat in milk chocolate by running it through an electric field. The result is healthier, but is it tastier?
 

Getty Images
June 25, 2016 | NPR · In the 1990s, the Portland Trail Blazers were one of the most dominant teams in the NBA. We’ve invited one of the team’s stars to answer three questions about people who’ve blazed their own trails.
 

Music

June 25, 2016 | NPR · All Things Considered is thinking about British songs that reflect people’s sentiments in the U.K. We picked some; if you can think of better songs to explain Brexit, tweet us @npratc #BrexitMix.
 

June 25, 2016 | NPR · Composer and keyboardist Bernie Worrell played funk, soul, and broke genres as a founding member of Parliament-Funkadelic and a performer with Talking Heads. Worrell died Friday at the age of 72.
 

June 25, 2016 | NPR · Candace Bahouth of the village of Pilton in the U.K. describes how the village evolves when one of the world’s biggest music festivals comes to town, and how people there feel about the ‘Brexit’ vote.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab