Governor John Hickenlooper is separating from his wife of ten years, Helen Thorpe. They issued a joint public statement today asking for privacy. Bente Birkeland has more from the state capitol.

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The governor and his wife say neither had an affair and they’d gone through extended couples counseling before reaching their decision, one which they say was mutual and amicable. They say they remain close friends, and are going on a family vacation together this summer with their ten year old son. Hickenlooper will move into the Governor’s Mansion and says the split had nothing to do with the recent tragic events that Colorado has experienced.

Official release:

DENVER ­— Tuesday, July 31, 2012 — Gov. John Hickenlooper and his wife, Helen Thorpe, issued the following joint statement today, announcing their decision to separate:

“After years of marriage that have added tremendous love and depth to both of our lives, we have decided to separate. This decision is mutual and amicable. We continue to have the utmost respect for each other, and we remain close friends. We intend to continue functioning as a family that spends a great deal of time together. In fact, we will embark on our annual family vacation together this week, share meals often, and plan to spend holidays together. You can continue to expect to see both of us out in the community – sometimes together, sometimes solo. Please feel free to include both of us in social gatherings as we will not find it awkward.

“Our chief concern right now is the well-being of our son, so we ask everyone to respect our privacy as we make this transition. While public office made this announcement necessary, it will be the only statement we make on this private matter. We want to thank our friends, family, and community for all of the support you have shown us as a couple and as individuals, and for the support we know you will provide as we move forward.”

Both the Governor and Ms. Thorpe want the public to know that neither has had an affair, that they did seek extended counseling, and that this decision is unrelated to the difficult events Colorado has faced this summer. While the Governor will be moving into the Governor’s Mansion, he will also continue to spend time with his son at their private home.

 

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