Full text of the press release:

Steve Cox, who has served the City of Colorado Springs in various senior leadership roles, announced his retirement from the City of Colorado Springs today.

“When Mayor Bach was elected, I told him I would stay for one year. He asked me to reconsider my decision, but I told him, it’s time for me to be with family. I want to spend more time with my wife, my kids and my grandkids. I’ve had a fantastic career with the City, and will miss my colleagues, but my family is excited to have my full attention. I have a tee time with the mayor – and will support him in every way – we’ve become good friends,” Steve Cox said.

Steve Cox began his career with the Colorado Springs Fire Department thirty-one years ago. He rose through the ranks and served as Deputy Fire Chief, Fire Chief and Interim City Manager. In June 2011, Cox became Mayor Steve Bach’s Inaugural Chief of Staff. Then in January 2012, he assumed the position of Chief of Economic Vitality and Innovation. Cox was instrumental in building a consolidated approach for addressing the challenges associated with energizing our local economy. Steve Cox has been a key part of Mayor Bach’s executive team and will long be remembered as one of the very able City executives during the crises of the Waldo Canyon Fire.

“Steve Cox has been instrumental in many of our accomplishments this past year. I hate to see him go and tried to talk him into at least another year. His service to our City was tremendous and truly appreciated. I respect his decision though – Steve deserves time to concentrate on all things family. I’ll miss him, but we’ll be in touch.”

Mr. Cox will consult on large City projects in the future – his retirement is effective July 31, 2012.

 

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