This slide show is a sneak preview of a longer piece we’re working on about the legacy of renowned local architect Elizabeth Wright Ingraham. Though her name often leaves lips in the same breath as her grandfather, Frank Lloyd Wright, Wright Ingraham managed deftly managed to craft her own style without rejecting her grandfather’s or divorcing herself from the modernist lexicon. “La Casa,” pictured in this slide show, perches on the cliffs above Pueblo Reservoir in far greater contrast to its surrounding than her grandfather would ever have been comfortable. When it came on the market a few months ago, we couldn’t resist a trip to Pueblo to get a first hand look at. Like many of her later homes, it has a characteristic look of simple indestructibility that sets it against the fussy naturalism of her grandfather’s work, which often made his homes extraordinarily difficult to maintain. Here’s what Architectural Record has to say about “La Casa”:

Elizabeth Wright Ingraham sees La Casa as an “intervention” on the landscape, not a “statement.” The 5,017-square-foot house sits on a soaring cliff outside Colorado Springs, where winds have been clocked at 110 miles per hour. The continuous erosion of the cliff forced Ingraham to place the house back from the edge, but she recaptured the drama of the steep drop with a 27-foot skywalk cantilevered from the second floor. The skywalk is supported by a 58-foot steel truss that pierces the house and adds drama to an otherwise simple plan. The owners, two doctors, can enter the house from the garage through a protected glass-block-lined corridor. Glazed concrete-block walls, concrete terraces, and radiant-heated floors insulate the interior against the extreme temperature changes throughout the day. A rooftop entertainment deck over the study keeps parties free of the rattlesnakes ruling the natural terrain.

More to come!

 

5 Responses to Rooms with a View: La Casa at Pueblo Reservoir

  1. Mary Ellen says:

    What a liberating feeling this house radiates!

  2. Irma Vamp says:

    That IS an amazing house. …That said, I feel a little intimidated by excellence. Couldn’t you focus more on stories about finding “God” (or Buddha or Karma or whatnot) in the details of our all-too-human lives? A big part of “feel good” journalism is making me feel like I could do the same thing(s) as the subject of the story or segment or whatever. If I wanted to be intimidated by the accomplishments of others I’d get a The New Yorker subscription.

  3. Nancy Wilsted says:

    Incredible photographs of an amazing house. When was it built?

  4. Irma Vamp says:

    May I make a suggestion? Houses are fine but the Modbo and S.P.Q.R. art museums are about due for a lil’ Big Somethin’. They’re re-inventing folk illustration for we the people of Colo Spgs in 21st century!

  5. Hal R. says:

    Very cool.

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