A listeria outbreak in cantaloupes last fall that was traced to a southeastern Colorado farm killed thirty people and sickened dozens more in 28 states. The economic fallout from the tragedy has also been far reaching; consumer demand for melons dropped in half. Now with the spring planting season underway, farmers are looking to improve their image. From Rocky Mountain Community Radio sister station KUNC, Kirk Siegler reports.

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For a look at how farmers coped with the end of last year’s growing season, listen to this story from October’s Western Skies.

 

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News

July 22, 2014 | NPR · The recall applies to “certain lots of whole peaches (white and yellow), nectarines (white and yellow), plums and pluots” from a California packing company, the FDA says.
 

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Arts & Life

July 22, 2014 | NPR · Alan Cheuse reviews Angels Make Their Hope Here, by Breena Clarke.
 

July 22, 2014 | NPR · Arthur Allen’s new book, The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl, describes how a WWII scientist in Poland smuggled the typhus vaccine to Jews — while his team made a weakened version for the Nazis.
 

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July 22, 2014 | NPR · This year’s Television Critics Association press tour found networks pitching hard for the view beyond overnight ratings. But getting the right number isn’t the end of the issue.
 

Music

July 22, 2014 | NPR · On a visit to a Washington Nationals game, Robert Siegel was struck by the singer of the national anthem — by his baritone and his apt name: D.C. Washington. So, he invited Washington to the studio.
 

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July 22, 2014 | NPR · A pine tree planted in Los Angeles in memory of George Harrison is one of several brought down in Griffith Park by an infestation.
 

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July 22, 2014 | NPR · The “boom-chicka-boom” of Johnny Cash’s guitar. The ghostly echo on Elvis Presley’s voice. More than 60 years after these early recordings, the studio is still making music the old-fashioned way.
 

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