Yesterday marked the 80th Anniversary of the last day of streetcar service in Colorado Springs, April 30, 1932. Here are two pieces from the archives that tell the story of the golden days of public transportation in the shadow of Pikes Peak.

In this slide show of images from the Pikes Peak Library District’s Digital Photography Archive with text by Marshall Sprague from his history of the region, Newport in the Rockies (read by Craig Richardson), we hope you’ll catch a glimpse of Colorado Springs’ former public transportation glory as it was funded by millionaire gold king Winfield Scott Stratton.

If you want to learn more, you can visit the Pikes Peak Historical Street Railway Foundation/Colorado Springs and Interurban Railway museum to see more photos, artifacts and the amazing trolleys they’re restoring. There’s also a great exhibition of images, models and relics from Colorado Springs’ streetcar system on display through December 31 at the Cheyenne Mountain Heritage Center (open today from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.). We’ve also done a few pieces on the possibility of reintroducing trolleys to the streets of Colorado Springs, which you can watch HERE.

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Here we speak with John Haney, a member of the Board of Directors of the Pikes Peak Historical Street Railway Foundation and the co-author of Pikes Peak Trolleys: A History of the Colorado Springs Streetcar System.

An Interview with John Haney

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2 Responses to 80th Anniversary of the Last Streetcar Service in Colorado Springs

  1. Ryan Lloyd says:

    Such a shame that it’s gone. Here’s to hoping it comes back!

  2. Tye says:

    Put a streetcar costume on a bus chassis. Everyone would ride it then. Sad but true.

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