If you missed the Joseph Scheer exhibition at I.D.E.A. Space last fall and/or this interview we did with him, AND you find yourself disgusted/intrigued with this Springs’s Miller Moth swarm, perhaps this feature will cheer you a bit, if not give you a little more apprecation for our dusty brown visitors.


(Scans and photos of moths, caterpillars, bats, the landscape and culture of Sonora, Mexico all by Joseph Scheer)

KRCC’s Interview With Joseph Scheer.

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Joseph Scheer, Professor of Print Media and Co director of the School for Electronic Arts at the School of Art and Design at Alfred University in New York, is obsessed with Moths. We spoke with him about him about his obesession and about the fine line between new scanning/printing technologies and photography, and the limitless (and sometimes tedious) possibilities of new media.

 

3 Responses to The Discreet Charms of Moths

  1. Candice says:

    I put a lamp over a bowl of water and that works ok. I like them as art too. Wish i saw the exhibit at cc.

    I have a friend that is a journalist and he said that he doesnt like his forth wall broken and thats why you should not film him or interrupt him when hes reporting on camera. Its basically cruel he thhinks and i agree.

  2. Mary says:

    I really understand Joseph’s feeling of ‘why wasn’t I told?!’. I feel the same way about spiders. I started out doing a project to keep my girls from screaming about them. We’d catch new ones in jars of alcohol. We’d put repeats outside in the park. We found so many kinds in just my house and my little suburban backyard. I wanted the girls to look them up, find their names, find out if they were biters. But there was SO little information available. And I found that jars were a bad idea – the spiders would die curled up tightly, and would become no longer identifiable. Some day I’d like to recruit a bunch of kids – maybe a whole elementary class to bring me spiders to photograph. And I’d like to find a real naturalist to tell me a good way to preserve them.

  3. tOkKa says:

    –>> .. he took the words right outta my moth.

    XD

    ~ t

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