It’s difficult to overstate the achievement of Fun Home, which has already taken its rightful place next to greats like Maus by Art Spiegelman and Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi in a genre that’s still defining its terms in a nebulous space between art and literature. There’s little question that Bechdel’s achievement is in pushing the graphic memoir to its full literary potential. Though images dominate the visual texture of Fun Home, it’s the writing that reveals and uncovers the memoir’s quietly allegorical drama of her father’s repressed homosexuality and his death shortly after Bechdel herself came out as a young lesbian. Told obliquely through the books her father—an English teacher and part-time mortician—loved in ways that he could never love his own children, Fun Home brings her father to life with equal parts personal indictment and historical compassion. We spoke with Bechdel about Fun Home and her now-retired comic strip “Dykes to Watch Out For” by phone in advance of her appearance at tomorrow night’s Graphic Narratives Symposium, which includes the equally amazing cartoonist Chris Ware, at Colorado College. (Full details HERE).

Alison Bechdel Interview

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3 Responses to Graphic Greats at Colorado College Tomorrow Night

  1. Ruth Adele says:

    Thanks, Noel, for helping bring Alison Bechdel and lesbian culture to the attention of the Colorado Springs community. Good job, as always! -Ruth

  2. I really loved this event, especially the Chris and Alison’s wit and descriptions of their process. Many thanks for bringing them here.

  3. Samantha says:

    Great interview. I could relate to Alison on many levels. This was an enjoyable interview. Thank you for the introduction to this work!

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