Almost every year we’re blown away by some of the work by senior art majors at Colorado College and this year is no exception. Eleanor Anderson’s self-described 2.5-dimensional embroidered fabric prints combine a Bauhaus aesthetic with inflences ranging from Jean Gumpper and Mary Chenoweth to Anni Albers. Not surprisingly, the images in the slide show don’t do the work justice and you should stop by and see them for yourself during business hours in the atrium at Packard Hall on the Colorado College campus through the end of the week.

 

13 Responses to Interstices: Eleanor Anderson’s 2.5-D Fabric Art

  1. Yeah! It’s like dada & moma matricuated a child.

  2. Philip says:

    I luv it!

  3. Philip says:

    Oops, meant to post: “I love it!”

  4. Mortimer says:

    Nice job! Whenever I think “art is dead” I’ll see something like this & THEN think “not today it ain’t!”

  5. James says:

    Do i detect a slight klaus kinski influence? ???

  6. todd says:

    its 10-0 i m at th weber st gallerey thru apr cheket

  7. Sue Carlson says:

    Eleanor…these are amazing. The DA art department will be proud!

  8. Sordie says:

    They have a presence!

  9. Jim Gass says:

    Thanks Eleanor & Big Something! Can you show the images true to scale next time possibly?

  10. Jim Gass says:

    I mean actual size. I love the work but I can’t tell how big it all is! Could you include dimensions? If you put something in the pic like a clock or a watch then we’d know the basic dimensions, too. Thanks!

  11. Jim Gass says:

    or a glove.

  12. Mary Stroh Henderson says:

    This is wonderful…

  13. Eleanor says:

    Here is my website: http://eleanoranderson.com/home.html

    It has dimensions listed next to pieces. Thanks for the comments!

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