For local printmaker Jean Gumpper, whose preferred subject matter is water, an artist residency in Death Valley last April presented some very literal challenges. But as she discovered during her time there, water and the life it provides are abundant even in the hottest desert when you’re paying attention.

Stay tuned tomorrow to see Gumpper’s prints inspired by her time in Death Valley.

 

8 Responses to In the Shadow of the Valley of Death Valley, Part 1

  1. Susan says:

    What a great opportunity for such a talented artist. Can’t wait to see the art that resulted from this residency!

  2. Sean says:

    Great story & photographs. Jean’s a marvelous artist. Looking forward to tomorrow’s TBS.

  3. Jeremy says:

    Some pretty cool photos. Of course they make me miss the Desert Southwest in general and Death Valley specifically. Have visited DVNP a couple times. On one trip it snowed on the valley floor which is a pretty rare event. FYI: Easily one of the 5 most beautiful natural spots I have ever been to (not covered in these photos) is located at the remote far N end of the Park – the Eureka Sand Dunes. Truly extraordinary!

  4. Kathryn says:

    Thanks, Jean, for once again opening our eyes to unexpected beauty.

  5. Mary says:

    Wow Jean! Wonderful photos and info. Well done. I’m looking forward to part 2. I’m also looking forward to seeing the art you created from this experience.

  6. Very Very cool Jean. Some times the most desolate places have the most vibrant life. That lizard was somthing else! Thanks for sharing your outstanding work with us. Later bff, Mary

  7. Samantha says:

    Wow, Jean. Thank you for sharing. I have one of your yummy prints. I look forward to seeing the work your sojourn to the desert will have inspired!

  8. Monica E. says:

    Jean – such beautiful photographs, great hearing you – I look fwd to Part 2 and seeing your woodcuts from such a unique place.

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