If you aren’t a competitive figure skater, you probably aren’t aware that Colorado Springs is home to U.S. Figure Skating, The World Figure Skating Museum and Hall of Fame, and an illustrious figure skating history filled with legends, triumphs and a few tragedies. This weekend will mark another historic moment with the 2012 ISU Four Continents Figure Skating Championships—an international competition on the road to the World Championships that will feature, among many others, current World Champion Patrick Chan (a Canadian who lives and trains in Colorado Springs); Defending Four Continents champion Daisuke Takahashi from Japan; and Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, the reigning Olympic ice dancing champions from Canada. Whether you plan to attend or not, we thought it a fine time to brush up on our local figure skating history with David Raith, Executive Director of U.S. Figure Skating.

To find out more about this weekend’s Four Continents events, click HERE.

 

2 Responses to A Brief History of Figure Skating in Colorado Springs

  1. Joyce A. Eckler says:

    Nice interview to learn some facts and history of ice skating in Colorado Springs; the world class coaches and notable competitors and champions and remember the tragedy that befell the US World Skating Team. It’s still an attraction to all competing ice skaters.

  2. Nancy Atherton says:

    One of the reasons I moved to the Springs was to enjoy its historic and ongoing connection to the beautiful sport of figure skating. When friends come to visit, I always take them to the Figure Skating Museum and Hall of Fame. And, yes, I have my tickets for Four Continents 2012! I hope Skate America will return to the World Arena, too!

News

Getty
March 1, 2015 | NPR · As Mr. Spock on Star Trek, the late Leonard Nimoy embodied the conflicts faced by many biracial and other people of color. Even on the diverse crew of the Enterprise, he stood out.
 

Courtesy of Mohammed Al Amari
March 1, 2015 | NPR · Syria’s refugees are waiting for a new life. The artists among them are depicting this life in limbo — and their memories of the country they left behind.
 

Courtesy of Chris Newman
March 1, 2015 | NPR · Lung cancer survivors who met online banded together to get an option they credited with helping them added to treatment guidelines used by cancer specialists.
 

Arts & Life

NBCU Photo Bank
March 1, 2015 | NPR · Mr. Spock was famously the Starship Enterprise’s resident emotionless alien. But writer Elizabeth Graham says many alienated teenage nerds found something to love and share behind that mask of calm.
 

March 1, 2015 | NPR · Margaret Drabble’s The Millstone, set in the 1960s, tells the story of a young, unmarried woman who finds herself pregnant. Author Tessa Hadley says this 50-year-old novel is a weekend must-read.
 

The CW
February 28, 2015 | NPR · Women and minorities continue to be under-represented on TV and in film, both behind and in front of the camera, according to a new study — even though diverse films and shows make more money.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
February 28, 2015 | NPR · The electronic artist’s new album, Gliss Riffer, is his most accesible yet. In a conversation with Arun Rath, he waxes philosophic on stress, technology and the value of a wandering mind.
 

Courtesy of the artist
February 28, 2015 | NPR · From Lana Del Rey to Father John Misty, musicians in the current pop moment who expose themselves, warts and all, do so in isolation, without support or challenge from a like-minded community.
 

Courtesy of the artist
February 28, 2015 | NPR · A Californian by way of North Dakota, with a voice that belies his gender, the singer-songwriter takes pride in being hard to pin down.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab