If you aren’t a competitive figure skater, you probably aren’t aware that Colorado Springs is home to U.S. Figure Skating, The World Figure Skating Museum and Hall of Fame, and an illustrious figure skating history filled with legends, triumphs and a few tragedies. This weekend will mark another historic moment with the 2012 ISU Four Continents Figure Skating Championships—an international competition on the road to the World Championships that will feature, among many others, current World Champion Patrick Chan (a Canadian who lives and trains in Colorado Springs); Defending Four Continents champion Daisuke Takahashi from Japan; and Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, the reigning Olympic ice dancing champions from Canada. Whether you plan to attend or not, we thought it a fine time to brush up on our local figure skating history with David Raith, Executive Director of U.S. Figure Skating.

To find out more about this weekend’s Four Continents events, click HERE.

 

2 Responses to A Brief History of Figure Skating in Colorado Springs

  1. Joyce A. Eckler says:

    Nice interview to learn some facts and history of ice skating in Colorado Springs; the world class coaches and notable competitors and champions and remember the tragedy that befell the US World Skating Team. It’s still an attraction to all competing ice skaters.

  2. Nancy Atherton says:

    One of the reasons I moved to the Springs was to enjoy its historic and ongoing connection to the beautiful sport of figure skating. When friends come to visit, I always take them to the Figure Skating Museum and Hall of Fame. And, yes, I have my tickets for Four Continents 2012! I hope Skate America will return to the World Arena, too!

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