Colorado’s lawmakers in Washington differ in how to pay for extended tax cuts (Denver Post). Colorado officials consider disclosure rules for hydraulic fracturing (Denver Business Journal*). Hotels across the state appear busier, but rates remain mostly flat (Denver Business Journal). A farmer’s alliance promotes agricultural water needs at a conference (Chieftain). Colorado’s Agricultural Secretary says the state should plan growth around water supplies, rather than moving water to the growth (Chieftain). Colorado Lieutenant Governor Joe Garcia talks consolidation for rural schools at an education summit at Trinidad State Junior College (Trinidad Times-Independent).

In Colorado Springs, Van Briggle Pottery goes up for sale (Gazette). First & Main will host a free public electric-vehicle charging station (Gazette, Colorado Springs Business Journal). The Pikes Peak Library District will buy the former MCI building near Chapel Hills Mall (Gazette). The Gazette reorganizes, and the paper’s editor is stepping down (Gazette, KRDO). Office vacancy rates in the city are similar to other cities of similar size (Colorado Springs Business Journal*).

Pueblo‘s City Manager gets $7,000 to move inside the city limits (KOAA). CSU-Pueblo’s new president starts work (Chieftain). The Pueblo Economic Development Corporation selects its new board (Chieftain).

Las Animas County plans to spend $2 million less next year (Trinidad Times-Independent). A Purgatoire Riverwalk flag project will get a second vote after concerns over funding and prior approval (Trinidad Times-Independent). Mt. Carmel Center in Trinidad gets El Pomar grants (Trinidad Times-Independent).

In Colfax County, New Mexico, a Raton zoning panel turned down a special-use request for gravel mining and other purposes on private property (Raton Range). Eagle Nest and Springer officially received economic development designations from the state (Raton Range).

Disclaimer: KRCC and KRCC News make no guarantees regarding the content within these reports, however consider them part of the news and media outlets reporting on issues affecting our coverage area. The Index is not exhaustive, and is not an endorsement of any kind. * indicates subscription required.

 

Comments are closed.

News

Steve Hebert for ProPublica
December 19, 2014 | NPR · Nonprofit hospitals provide assistance to poor patients in exchange for tax breaks. But some still seize wages of poor patients with unpaid bills — even those who qualify for free or reduced care.
 

AP
December 19, 2014 | NPR · Cuba is one of the least connected countries on Earth, with 5 percent of residents online. But it could become the Caribbean’s largest market if the Castros open the nation up to the Internet.
 

December 19, 2014 | NPR · Marine scientists plumbing the deepest part of the ocean sent microphones and collection probes baited with chicken to the bottom of a trench near Guam. Now they watch, wait … and listen.
 

Arts & Life

The Weinstein Company
December 19, 2014 | NPR · Walter Keane made his name with wistful paintings of big-eyed children — paintings actually done by his wife. Tim Burton directs and Amy Adams stars in Big Eyes, a new movie about the Keanes.
 

iStockphoto
December 19, 2014 | NPR · Pearl shares the books she loved this year that you might not have heard of. Her list includes a Hollywood satire, two thrillers, a young adult novel and a nonfiction book about World War I.
 

Film Movement
December 18, 2014 | NPR · The film If You Don’t, I Will has some strong dialogue and performances, but its tale of a marriage in peril sags too often in its recounting of the journey.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
December 18, 2014 | WXPN · We speak with the head of Nacional Records about three essential latin alternative songs.
 

Courtesy of the artist
December 18, 2014 | WXPN · David Dye sits down with Andrew Savage and Austin Brown to discuss their prolific year.
 

December 18, 2014 | NPR · Cuban rhythms and melodies have been part of what’s been called the most American of art forms — jazz — ever since Jelly Roll Morton first heard them in the port of New Orleans and used them in his music. Josephine Baker performed in Cuba and Nat King Cole recorded there. But the revolution made cultural exchange all but impossible and even supposedly open-minded artists and musicians took sides.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab