A proposed rule goes before the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Comission today that would require all oil and gas companies to post online the makeup of the fluids used in hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. Some are lauding it as a way to make the industry more transparent, but environmentalists say it’s riddled with loopholes and weak language. Ariana Brocious from KVNF in Paonia and Luke Runyon from Aspen Public Radio sit down to explore the new proposed rule, and how it compares to other states.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

KVNF, Aspen Public Radio, and KRCC are all members of Rocky Mountain Community Radio.

 

2 Responses to Examining a New Fracking Disclosure Proposal

  1. Brad Bean says:

    Methane is odorless and cannot be smelled in tap water as reported in your story on “fracing”. Odorant is added to natural gas so that it can be detected once it has extracted, and processed – far downstream of the underground reservoir.

    • Andrea Chalfin News Dir. says:

      Hi Brad,

      You are right–methane is odorless. It’s an easy mistake to make, but I should have caught it nonetheless. Thanks for the correction.

      I’d like to also point interested people to our Western Skies episode on Energy from earlier this year–we had a conversation that included COCGG head Dave Neslin, and among other things, we talked about some of the work they’ve done as it pertains to hydraulic fracturing.

      Thanks for listening,

      Andrea.

News

LA Johnson/NPR
March 4, 2015 | NPR · The IRS and the Education Department already have the power to make the FAFSA easier without cutting questions. So why haven’t they?
 

AP
March 4, 2015 | NPR · Racists emails and shocking statistics will be on display when the Justice Department (officially) releases a report about the Ferguson Police Department.
 

Getty Images
March 4, 2015 | NPR · Misao Okawa of Japan is now 117. She has reigned as the world’s oldest living person since 2013, when Guinness World Records certified that she was 115.
 

Arts & Life

NPR
March 4, 2015 | NPR · The sixth volume of C.J. Sansom’s Shardlake mysteries is set during the last days of England’s King Henry VIII, as a potentially explosive religious manuscript written by his queen has gone missing.
 

AP
March 4, 2015 | NPR · In 2004, Jin was one of the first Asian-Americans to drop a major label rap album. One controversial song, “Learn Chinese,” raised eyebrows. A decade later, he’s trying to rephrase the message.
 

Courtesy of Knopf
March 4, 2015 | NPR · Kazuo Ishiguro’s latest novel is set in a mythical Arthurian England. But though the premise was promising, the book is too vague to make much of an impact.
 

Music

Courtesy of the Artist
March 4, 2015 | NPR · This riveting stop-motion animation, reminiscent of the video for Peter Gabriel’s “Sledgehammer,” may be your gateway to the fascinating work of the composer and producer Eskmo.
 

AP
March 4, 2015 | NPR · In 2004, Jin was one of the first Asian-Americans to drop a major label rap album. One controversial song, “Learn Chinese,” raised eyebrows. A decade later, he’s trying to rephrase the message.
 

Courtesy of Kiley Kraskouskas
March 4, 2015 | NPR · The Last Song Before the War presents the glorious sounds of the 2011 Festival in the Desert, held shortly before Islamic extremists took over the region and banned music.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab