Who could resist the intrigue of a novel about a young idealistic lefty learning the messy lessons of life during the 1960s against the backdrop of the civil rights movement and the San Luis Valley, especially when the book is illustrated by none other than Colorado Springs’ own ultra-conservative political cartoonist Chuck Asay?

We sat down with journalist, activist and novelist Terry Marshall and his fellow San Luis Valley native Chuck Asay to talk about Marshall’s novel, the common ground that brought them together, what they learned from one another during the process, and the parallels to the Occupy Wall Street and Tea Party movements now.

Conversation with Terry Marshall and Chuck Asay

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There will be a reception and signing from 5 to 6 p.m tonight with refreshments in the Gates Common Room in Palmer Hall on the Colorado College Campus. Terry and Chuck will then hold a discussion from 6 to 8. For more information on the book and Terry Marshall, go to www.terrymarshallfiction.com or www.sodasprings-thebook.com.

 

One Response to Tonight: Love, Sex, Civil Rights and The Messy Business of Change

  1. Bill says:

    I love this kind of thing: namely, two, highly committed folks of opposite philosophies pulling their punches to explore something together and going beyond (and perhaps raising the consciousness of) their constituencies to go “on the air” to do this kind of interview.

    Chuck’s editorial cartoons would sometimes infuriate me as a kid; but my dad, a newspaper editor at the time, knew Chuck and presented him as a thoughtful, affable person. I took his word for it and, decades later, this interview proved him right.

    …and I want to get the book. I knew there was a lot to the San Luis Valley; but this opens up a whole other vista. Could Soda Springs be the new “Milagro Beanfield War”?

    Well done, Terry & Chuck.

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