Who could resist the intrigue of a novel about a young idealistic lefty learning the messy lessons of life during the 1960s against the backdrop of the civil rights movement and the San Luis Valley, especially when the book is illustrated by none other than Colorado Springs’ own ultra-conservative political cartoonist Chuck Asay?

We sat down with journalist, activist and novelist Terry Marshall and his fellow San Luis Valley native Chuck Asay to talk about Marshall’s novel, the common ground that brought them together, what they learned from one another during the process, and the parallels to the Occupy Wall Street and Tea Party movements now.

Conversation with Terry Marshall and Chuck Asay

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

There will be a reception and signing from 5 to 6 p.m tonight with refreshments in the Gates Common Room in Palmer Hall on the Colorado College Campus. Terry and Chuck will then hold a discussion from 6 to 8. For more information on the book and Terry Marshall, go to www.terrymarshallfiction.com or www.sodasprings-thebook.com.

 

One Response to Tonight: Love, Sex, Civil Rights and The Messy Business of Change

  1. Bill says:

    I love this kind of thing: namely, two, highly committed folks of opposite philosophies pulling their punches to explore something together and going beyond (and perhaps raising the consciousness of) their constituencies to go “on the air” to do this kind of interview.

    Chuck’s editorial cartoons would sometimes infuriate me as a kid; but my dad, a newspaper editor at the time, knew Chuck and presented him as a thoughtful, affable person. I took his word for it and, decades later, this interview proved him right.

    …and I want to get the book. I knew there was a lot to the San Luis Valley; but this opens up a whole other vista. Could Soda Springs be the new “Milagro Beanfield War”?

    Well done, Terry & Chuck.

News

June 22, 2017 | NPR · The Iraqi nationals were rounded up in the Detroit area in recent weeks by immigration authorities. They all had final deportation orders as well as criminal convictions, and many are Christians.
 

AP
June 22, 2017 | NPR · The population growth is being driven by high birth rates in developing nations as well as higher life expectancy worldwide.
 

June 22, 2017 | NPR · The Polk County Sheriff said he will recommend the inmates’ sentences be reduced after they called 911 when the deputy guarding them collapsed.
 

Arts & Life

Cinema Guild
June 22, 2017 | NPR · Director Patrick Shen features plenty of talking heads opining about our essential need for quiet and solitude, but this film works best when he captures moments of pristine, meditative stillness.
 

Focus Features
June 22, 2017 | NPR · Sofia Coppola’s lush visual aesthetic infuses this study in sublimated lust with just enough sly, Southern-Gothic bodice-ripping to intrigue and satisfy.
 

Lionsgate
June 22, 2017 | NPR · Critic Andrew Lapin praises the “unique, understated comic irony” of this largely autobiographical rom-com about a couple whose young relationship gets tested by matters cultural — and medical.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
June 23, 2017 | NPR · Algiers, now spread across three cities, have made a dense piece of work with The Underside of Power. Considering the record’s sprawling scope, we asked them help us understand it.
 

WXPN
June 22, 2017 | WXPN-FM · Since releasing her debut in May, the singer-songwriter has begun to turn heads with a fresh take on the Bakersfield sound and a knack for honest lyrics. Hear an interview and live performance.
 

YouTube
June 22, 2017 | NPR · Light and airy in its sweetness, the song blooms into fluffy, ebullient tufts of cotton candy — only to soon melt in the hot June sun and dry into a hardened candy shell.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab