Governor Hickenlooper will release his proposed budget early next week and pretty much everyone is expecting more cuts to K-12 schools. That’s why many education leaders are in the midst of a late hour blitz pushing for the passage of Proposition 103. It would temporarily raise state sales and income taxes to help fund schools. But many Republicans and business leaders – as well as the Governor – argue a down economy is not the time for even a modest tax increase. From Rocky Mountain Community Radio sister station KUNC, Kirk Siegler takes a look at Prop 103, the only statewide issue before Colorado voters.

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3 Responses to Examining Proposition 103

  1. Ker says:

    Investing in education is always a good idea. Colorado has underfunded education for years. Many rural schools, in particular, haven’t given raises or COLAs in the past ten years. Teachers welcome the demands but need to be paid for the extra time and effort needed for today’s students and governmental changes and requirements.
    Teachers don’t get paid vacations in the summer, the government gets to hold onto their pay and spread it out, preventing interest and lessening the ability to invest.
    I’m not sure Prop 103 is the answer but in a state with such a highly educated population, you’d think we’d value public education more.

  2. Ken says:

    I’ve heard that the revenues generated by this proposition will not be earmarked for education but will be going into the general fund. Is that true?

  3. Andrea Chalfin News Dir. says:

    Ken, according to the ballot language:

    “…requiring that the additional revenues resulting from these increased tax rates be spent only to fund public education from preschool through twelfth grade and public postsecondary education…”

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