While the term arborglyphs is usually reserved for the tree carvings of Basque and Irish sheepherders who used aspen trunks to communicate with one another came to the United States to tend sheep in places like the Pacific Northwest and Nevada (see a beautiful slide show of Basque arborglyphs from Nevada HERE) there’s a strange poetry to the furtively carved initials and hearts that scar the aspens along the old road to Cripple Creek. Usually little more than crude initials, a heart and perhaps a date, these scratchings, taken as a whole, are less acts of senseless vandalism than amorous expressions inspired in part, no doubt, by the irresistible beauty of the aspens.

Obviously, we don’t advocate carving into these beautiful and delicate trees (read more about their amazing biology HERE), but we do recommend heading up Old Stage and Gold Camp Roads this fall to catch the spectacular displays of color.

The music in this piece is “Song for Obol” by Arborea (who are rumored to be playing Colorado Springs sometime in the next week or so, and will definitely play The Walnut Room in Denver on September 30). You can download it for free by clicking on the downward pointing arrow in this player:

 

4 Responses to Arborglyphs on Goldcamp Aspens

  1. Mike Procell says:

    Beauteous! And thanks for the word of the day: Arborglyphs

  2. Nancy Wilsted says:

    That was lovely.

  3. Matt Payne says:

    Sweet. When I heard the promo my first reaction was: “why are they advocating this!” Glad it was not the case =D

  4. Kurt Schwemmer says:

    The music is amazing!

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