The State Fair is on track for record attendance (KRDO). The Santa Fe Trail Scenic and Historic Byway-Mountain Branch receives a federal grant (LaJunta Tribune-Democrat). Monday is the end of the public comment period for the proposed Over the River project (Canon City Daily Record).

In Colorado Springs, school officials in D-12 and D-49 plan to put tax initiatives on November’s ballot (Gazette). The city’s attorney resigns (Colorado Springs Business Journal), and the search is on for a replacement (Gazette). So-called hybrid stop lights are still causing confusion (KXRM). The city has seen record-breaking heat this summer (KOAA). More solar energy could be coming to town (KXRM). A company offering insurance against falling home prices looks to enter the Colorado Springs market (CSBJ*).

In Pueblo, residents could see an energy rate increase (Pueblo Chieftain, KOAA). Two counterfeit $100 bills were used in Pueblo stores over the weekend, but counterfeit bills have shown up all summer in the city (KKTV). City Council faces pressure to involve others in tax talks (Chieftain). Local Pueblo school boards will see contested races in November (Chieftain).

Last year’s anonymous buyer of Buckskin Joe’s near Canon City is revealed as billionaire William Koch (Gazette).

In New Mexico, the state’s racing commission extended the deadline for horse-racing license applications, which continues to draw interest from Raton (Raton Range).

Disclaimer: KRCC and KRCC News make no guarantees regarding the content within these reports, however consider them part of the news and media outlets reporting on issues affecting our coverage area. The Index is not exhaustive, and is not an endorsement of any kind. * indicates subscription required.

 

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NPR
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Arts & Life

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Courtesy of the artist
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