The United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon visits Denver to talk about energy innovation (Denver Post). Cyclists move through Independence Pass (Gazette). State Fair organizers expect a large turnout (KRDO). The USGS plans to monitor aftershocks from an earthquake near Trinidad (KKTV). Lt. Gov. Joe Garcia testifies in education funding lawsuit (Chieftain).

In El Paso County, school board recall efforts move forward (Gazette). D-49 is still considering a mill levy and bond measure (Gazette). The Colorado Springs Independent takes a look at redistricting the state’s legislative districts and its potential impact on the county.

In Colorado Springs, council decides to put a Memorial Health System issue on the ballot (Colorado Springs Independent). The Independent examines child safety questions resulting from a police officer charged with sex offenses. Parents of a child who died playing a “choke game” hope they can help spread awareness (KOAA, KRDO, KKTV). Ft. Carson soldiers return after a year in the Middle East (Gazette, KRDO).

Pueblo‘s schools are expected to drop to the lowest category of achievement (Chieftain). A long-time East Side activist enters the city council race for District 2 (Chieftain).

The Raton Basin is included in an EPA study on hydraulic fracturing (Trinidad Times-Independent).

The Custer County Planning Commission approves a meat processing facility (Wet Mountain Tribune). Fremont County Commissioners consider redrawing commissioner districts (Canon City Daily Record). Canon City gets another city council candidate for District 2 (Canon City Daily Record). Florence‘s City Manager plans to retire (Canon City Daily Record).

Disclaimer: KRCC and KRCC News make no guarantees regarding the content within these reports, however consider them part of the news and media outlets reporting on issues affecting our coverage area. The Index is not exhaustive, and is not an endorsement of any kind. * indicates subscription required.

 

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News

September 25, 2016 | NPR · When it’s time to divorce, Hollywood celebs (like a certain Brad and Angelina) turn to the queen of breakup litigation, Laura Wasser. NPR’s Rachel Martin speaks with Vanity Fair’s Julie Miller.
 

September 25, 2016 | NPR · The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is open to the public after a dedication ceremony on Saturday. President Obama cut the ribbon on the brand new museum.
 

Side Effects Public Media
September 25, 2016 | SEPM · Carfentanil, a potent variation on fentanyl, is being blamed for a wave of opioid overdoses. In Cincinnati, the coroner, crime lab and first responders are struggling to keep up.
 

Arts & Life

September 25, 2016 | NPR · Humbert Humbert, the main character in Lolita, is one of the most famous “sympathetic” villains in history. Today, a story from the point of view of a sexual predator might not get told in literature.
 

Bettmann Archive/Getty Images
September 25, 2016 | NPR · All this week on NPR, you’ll hear the voices of people Studs Terkel interviewed in his book, Working. Among the interviews you’ll hear this week are a telephone operator and hotel piano player.
 

September 25, 2016 | NPR · Leigh Bardugo’s followup to her steampunky heist tale Six of Crows follows teenage criminal mastermind Kaz and his ragged crew as they take revenge for a betrayal and deal with a dangerous drug.
 

Music

NPR
September 25, 2016 | NPR · This summer, Hamilton met NPR Music in his hometown of Charlotte, N.C. for a tour of some of the places — from his boyhood church to the barbershop where he cut hair — that shaped his voice.
 

Courtesy of the artist
September 25, 2016 | NPR · Mendoza says she’s often felt caught between cultures. But she’s learned to embrace multiple identities simultaneously — and it shows in her music.
 

Courtesy of the artist
September 24, 2016 | NPR · The international ambassador for Louisiana roots music died early Saturday morning of lung cancer.
 

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