The United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon visits Denver to talk about energy innovation (Denver Post). Cyclists move through Independence Pass (Gazette). State Fair organizers expect a large turnout (KRDO). The USGS plans to monitor aftershocks from an earthquake near Trinidad (KKTV). Lt. Gov. Joe Garcia testifies in education funding lawsuit (Chieftain).

In El Paso County, school board recall efforts move forward (Gazette). D-49 is still considering a mill levy and bond measure (Gazette). The Colorado Springs Independent takes a look at redistricting the state’s legislative districts and its potential impact on the county.

In Colorado Springs, council decides to put a Memorial Health System issue on the ballot (Colorado Springs Independent). The Independent examines child safety questions resulting from a police officer charged with sex offenses. Parents of a child who died playing a “choke game” hope they can help spread awareness (KOAA, KRDO, KKTV). Ft. Carson soldiers return after a year in the Middle East (Gazette, KRDO).

Pueblo‘s schools are expected to drop to the lowest category of achievement (Chieftain). A long-time East Side activist enters the city council race for District 2 (Chieftain).

The Raton Basin is included in an EPA study on hydraulic fracturing (Trinidad Times-Independent).

The Custer County Planning Commission approves a meat processing facility (Wet Mountain Tribune). Fremont County Commissioners consider redrawing commissioner districts (Canon City Daily Record). Canon City gets another city council candidate for District 2 (Canon City Daily Record). Florence‘s City Manager plans to retire (Canon City Daily Record).

Disclaimer: KRCC and KRCC News make no guarantees regarding the content within these reports, however consider them part of the news and media outlets reporting on issues affecting our coverage area. The Index is not exhaustive, and is not an endorsement of any kind. * indicates subscription required.

 

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News

AP
October 20, 2014 | KWMU · Many in the city are worried about its future, and there’s speculation there will be a “mass migration” should violence erupt again. But some residents remain committed to the city.
 

October 20, 2014 | NPR · The new guidelines call for a site supervisor, who makes sure healthcare workers put on and remove their personal protective equipment correctly.
 

NOAA
October 20, 2014 | NPR · The agency says if 2014 continues to be this hot, it’s on pace to be the hottest year on record.
 

Arts & Life

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
October 20, 2014 | NPR · Joel Beckerman is a composer who specializes in sonic branding. His new book is called The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms the Way We Think, Feel, and Buy.
 

iStockphoto
October 20, 2014 | NPR · When police pulled a gun on Bryan Stevenson as he was sitting quietly in his car in Atlanta, he knew he had to effect change. His memoir describes his attempts, including freeing men on death row.
 

AFP/Getty Images
October 20, 2014 | NPR · The Nobel laureate taught at Princeton University for 17 years. Now, her papers — some 180 linear feet of them — are returning to be housed in the school’s library. Also: a roundup of new releases.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 20, 2014 | NPR · The singer and activist tackles jazz standards, including “Strange Fruit” and others, on her new album. Here, she and NPR’s Steve Inskeep discuss how she connects with the present through the past.
 

NPR
October 20, 2014 | NPR · D’Amato’s new album The Shipwreck From The Shore can feel Motown-y, garage-y and Springsteen-y, and all that production serves his songs well. But here the Tiny Desk, his music is sparer.
 

Courtesy of the artist
October 20, 2014 | NPR · The pop singer and songwriter sounds more comfortable and assured on her second album, Tough Love. “This life is quite bizarre sometimes,” she tells NPR’s Audie Cornish.
 

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