Listen to KRCC’s in-studio performance with Luisa Maita. Luisa performs tonight as third and final part of the World Music Series.

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KRCC and the Pikes Peak Library District present the final concert of the 2011 World Music Series with Luisa Maita August 24th – 7pm

Location: Armstrong Hall, Colorado College Campus, Colorado Springs, CO.

FREE Admission is free with a suggested donation of one non-perishable food item for Care and Share.

 

2 Responses to Luisa Maita In-Studio

  1. When we first arrived at Armstrong Hall, there was nobody there. Being recent arrivals from New York, we thought getting there at 6:09 pm for a door opening of 6:30 pm was early. So, we unexpectedly got front row seats. Bonus! This is the third event we have attended at Armstrong and I’ve wondered every time why there are no refreshments for sale. Maybe there’s some sort of archaic blue law forbidding evil alcohol, but even coffee, soda and water would be nice. Anyway, the place filled up, much to my relief, and there appeared to be standing room only. The band was was amazing. They made everything seem effortless, and the sounds the guitar player got out of his bank of foot pedals were terrific and unexpected. Luisa Maita was just excellent. Most of the time, she was quite subdued in her delivery, but occasionally she belted out a verse here and there. Her singer persona was sultry, with hints of understated sexual heat. Which was nicely balanced by her cute, and almost embarrassed personality that came out when she spoke in her broken English. The time flew by, and the crowd gave them an enthusiastic standing ovation. The only negative about the night was during the third song when I had to shush the women next to me who had been talking non-stop. So, thank you to everyone involved in making this event happen. It was world class.

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