Jewels Hall-Payne (L) and Molly Hall-Payne (R) stand next to their tiny home in Eaton. Photo: Susan Glairon.

While the 1980s introduced luxurious large homes for middle-income families, the tide is turning, in a big, or rather, small way. Across the country tiny homes are being built, some as small as 65-square-feet. Many are vacation homes, tiny cabins set on a choice piece of land, but some homeowners have turned to tiny homes as their primary residences. The trend is called the Small House Movement and KRCC producer Susan Glairon went to Eaton to visit the owners of one tiny home.

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2 Responses to Tiny Homes take Hold

  1. Mary says:

    I was with them until they said they wanted to raise a child in this little house. I’m encouraging them to seriously consider an addition when the time comes.

  2. cynthia says:

    I agree with Mary on the child issue, but I do like the movement to smaller homes and simpler living. People need to learn and teach their kids how to live within their means. I’m getting ready to build my own small house, its 2 stories with around 600 sq. feet in all, just enough space for me and my dogs! =)

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