Colorado and neighboring states show an improved economy, according to the U.S. Federal Reserve’s “Beige Book” (Denver Business Journal). The Bureau of Land Management released its final impact statement regarding the proposed ‘Over the River’ project, and is open to public review through August (Gazette), while one group files a lawsuit over an agreement between the project and the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Board (Canon City Daily Record). Three Colorado-only plants receive federal protection, meaning energy companies may have to adjust (Denver Post). Colorado College Political Science Professor Bob Loevy says federal lawmakers are ‘playing with fire’ in regards to the debt ceiling and debt negotiations (Chieftain). A state task force begins hearings in an effort to study zero-tolerance school policies (Chieftain).

In Colorado Springs, four people were killed in three separate incidents last night (Gazette). Some El Paso County residents find they may still owe money after foreclosures (Colorado Springs Business Journal*). Issues facing the city’s Memorial Health System may prove challenging to get an ownership measure on the November ballot (Colorado Springs Independent). The Independent looks at the efforts to create healthy meals in Colorado Springs School District 11.

In Pueblo, air conditioner chronic problems remain unsolved at the Pueblo City-County Health Department (Chieftain). A Pueblo City School board member seeks a second term (Chieftain). Fake ammunition arrives at the Pueblo Chemical Depot for training purposes (Chieftain).

Aurora pays farmers along the Lower Arkansas Valley in the form of water (LaJunta Tribune-Democrat). The Dinosaur Depot project in Canon City is temporarily on hold (Canon City Daily Record).

Disclaimer: KRCC and KRCC News make no guarantees regarding the content within these reports, however consider them part of the news and media outlets reporting on issues affecting our coverage area. The Index is not exhaustive, and is not an endorsement of any kind. * indicates subscription required.

 

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News

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September 21, 2014 | NPR · The top two presidential candidates in Afghanistan shake hands and sign a power-sharing deal, ending months of bitter disputes over who will succeed Hamid Karzai.
 

September 21, 2014 | NPR · The People’s Climate March is timed to draw the notice of world leaders gathering for this week’s U.N. Climate Summit in New York.
 

September 21, 2014 | WSHU · In Norwalk, Conn., a new hotel focusing on fitness targets business travelers who want to stick to healthy routines while on the road. It’s a new niche for the hospitality industry.
 

Arts & Life

September 21, 2014 | NPR · NPR’s Wade Goodwyn speaks with young Korean-American actor Ki Hong Lee, who appears in the new film, The Maze Runner, about how he broke into acting, and Asian-Americans in Hollywood.
 

September 21, 2014 | NPR · Astrophysicist Roberto Trotta argues that we don’t need jargon. He tells NPR’s Wade Goodwyn he’s compiled a history of the universe as we know it, using only the 1,000 most-common English words.
 

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September 21, 2014 | NPR · NPR’s Michel Martin asks a panel of award-winning playwrights how diverse artists are challenging Broadway’s landscape, and whether it matters.
 

Music

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September 20, 2014 | NPR · The Oscar and Grammy Award-winning R&B singer says her new album, JHUD, has more energy than her previous ballad-heavy albums, and expresses more of her “everyday person.”
 

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September 20, 2014 | NPR · A certain someone hates the word “songstress.” What else should be abolished from music writing?
 

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September 20, 2014 | NPR · As a kid, Scottish soul singer Paolo Nutini fell in love with male harmony groups like The Drifters. He says the fragility on those old recordings inspired the sound of his new album, Caustic Love.
 

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