Colorado and neighboring states show an improved economy, according to the U.S. Federal Reserve’s “Beige Book” (Denver Business Journal). The Bureau of Land Management released its final impact statement regarding the proposed ‘Over the River’ project, and is open to public review through August (Gazette), while one group files a lawsuit over an agreement between the project and the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Board (Canon City Daily Record). Three Colorado-only plants receive federal protection, meaning energy companies may have to adjust (Denver Post). Colorado College Political Science Professor Bob Loevy says federal lawmakers are ‘playing with fire’ in regards to the debt ceiling and debt negotiations (Chieftain). A state task force begins hearings in an effort to study zero-tolerance school policies (Chieftain).

In Colorado Springs, four people were killed in three separate incidents last night (Gazette). Some El Paso County residents find they may still owe money after foreclosures (Colorado Springs Business Journal*). Issues facing the city’s Memorial Health System may prove challenging to get an ownership measure on the November ballot (Colorado Springs Independent). The Independent looks at the efforts to create healthy meals in Colorado Springs School District 11.

In Pueblo, air conditioner chronic problems remain unsolved at the Pueblo City-County Health Department (Chieftain). A Pueblo City School board member seeks a second term (Chieftain). Fake ammunition arrives at the Pueblo Chemical Depot for training purposes (Chieftain).

Aurora pays farmers along the Lower Arkansas Valley in the form of water (LaJunta Tribune-Democrat). The Dinosaur Depot project in Canon City is temporarily on hold (Canon City Daily Record).

Disclaimer: KRCC and KRCC News make no guarantees regarding the content within these reports, however consider them part of the news and media outlets reporting on issues affecting our coverage area. The Index is not exhaustive, and is not an endorsement of any kind. * indicates subscription required.

 

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News

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