Colorado and neighboring states show an improved economy, according to the U.S. Federal Reserve’s “Beige Book” (Denver Business Journal). The Bureau of Land Management released its final impact statement regarding the proposed ‘Over the River’ project, and is open to public review through August (Gazette), while one group files a lawsuit over an agreement between the project and the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Board (Canon City Daily Record). Three Colorado-only plants receive federal protection, meaning energy companies may have to adjust (Denver Post). Colorado College Political Science Professor Bob Loevy says federal lawmakers are ‘playing with fire’ in regards to the debt ceiling and debt negotiations (Chieftain). A state task force begins hearings in an effort to study zero-tolerance school policies (Chieftain).

In Colorado Springs, four people were killed in three separate incidents last night (Gazette). Some El Paso County residents find they may still owe money after foreclosures (Colorado Springs Business Journal*). Issues facing the city’s Memorial Health System may prove challenging to get an ownership measure on the November ballot (Colorado Springs Independent). The Independent looks at the efforts to create healthy meals in Colorado Springs School District 11.

In Pueblo, air conditioner chronic problems remain unsolved at the Pueblo City-County Health Department (Chieftain). A Pueblo City School board member seeks a second term (Chieftain). Fake ammunition arrives at the Pueblo Chemical Depot for training purposes (Chieftain).

Aurora pays farmers along the Lower Arkansas Valley in the form of water (LaJunta Tribune-Democrat). The Dinosaur Depot project in Canon City is temporarily on hold (Canon City Daily Record).

Disclaimer: KRCC and KRCC News make no guarantees regarding the content within these reports, however consider them part of the news and media outlets reporting on issues affecting our coverage area. The Index is not exhaustive, and is not an endorsement of any kind. * indicates subscription required.

 

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News

NPR
April 17, 2015 | NPR · Golf is a sport that’s been enjoyed by both Democrats and Republicans through the decades, but bipartisan golf outings may be disappearing like a shanked tee shot into a water hazard.
 

April 17, 2015 | NPR · A New Orleans federal appeals court case may determine whether the President can implement his immigration plan before his term is up.
 

April 17, 2015 | NPR · Critics of the system that ushers food products to market say it is rife with conflicts of interest. When scientists depend on food companies for work, they may be less likely to contest food safety.
 

Arts & Life

Courtesy of Samuel Goldwyn Films
April 17, 2015 | NPR · NPR’s Bob Mondello reviews Tangerines, an unconventional war drama that was this year’s Estonian nominee for Best Foreign Language Film.
 

Clear Skies Nevada LLC/IFC Films
April 17, 2015 | NPR · The new film Good Kill is a little too blunt in its treatment of drone warfare, but strong work from Ethan Hawke as a troubled pilot helps it along.
 

April 17, 2015 | NPR · In 2001, Michael Finkel was fired for making up a story. Then he learns that a suspected murderer is posing as him, so he gets to know him. The best word for the drama is “dumb,” says David Edelstein.
 

Music

Courtesy of Decibel
April 18, 2015 | NPR · In the ’60s, the cheap music format was stocked in vending machines and embossed on cereal boxes. Now, magazines like Decibel and bands like Deerhoof are reviving the once-dead flexi disc.
 

Courtesy of the artist
April 18, 2015 | NPR · Stevens says it was hard to let go of her quest for perfection. But after a long creative process, Perfect Animal ended up “exactly how it was meant to be.”
 

Courtesy of Acoustic Sounds
April 17, 2015 | NPR · What’s getting in the way of the much touted resurgence of vinyl albums? There are very few functioning record presses, and nobody’s making new ones.
 

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