One of the most beautiful towns in Southern Colorado is undoutedly San Luis. Though it’s situated at 8,000 feet in high desert, the acequias (traditional water canals, which we’ll feature in our August episode of Western Skies) keep it a lush green in summer, which provides stark contrast to the arid hills above. Those contrasts make a perfect setting for San Luis artist Huberto Maestas’ Stations of the Cross sculptures, which line a trail up La Mesa de la Piedad y de la Misericordia to La Capilla de Todos los Santos.

 

5 Responses to The Stations of the Cross in San Luis

  1. Aubrey Fennewald says:

    It is a site to see. The town, the Valley, the Stations of the Cross climbing up the steep hillside… all beautiful in their own way. With another teacher/good friend, I took a group of 3rd and 4th graders there about ten years ago for a four-day long, overnight service-learning trip of Colorado History. Among other things, we wanted the students to understand Colorado’s heritage of Spanish settlers and traditional acacia farming, so prevalent in that area. The students were wonderful and the trip, fortunately, was quite a success. Thank you for sharing this and reminding me of that trip with those students!

  2. Sarah says:

    Wonderful slide show! Now want to visit the place in person to see the scuptures and what looks like a wonderful landscape. Thanks for sharing this.

  3. Nico says:

    Gorgeous!

  4. Mary H says:

    A catholic all my life, I have always found the stations to be shocking and sad. I have to say though, there is something deeply moving about these life-sized figures that seems to carry me past imagination. Even if not a Catholic or even a christian, anyone can grieve for the capacity for man’s cruelty to each other, can rise to our compassion for each other, and sympathize with a mother’s grief for her son through these images.

  5. suesun says:

    I second Mary’s comment. For me, it was a wonderful opportunity for my boys to learn the story of Jesus, since they haven’t had much traditional religious instruction. Each sculpture also contains a Bible verse or two. If you’re traveling through San Luis, it’s definitely worth taking the time to wander up the hill. Noel-did you ever find out what the little blue stones were for?

News

Getty Images
June 29, 2016 | NPR · An initiative has officially obtained enough signatures to be placed on November’s ballot. It would allow adults to possess up to an ounce of marijuana and grow up to six plants for recreational use.
 

Getty Images
June 29, 2016 | NPR · Environmental groups have asked the U.S. to give the prized fish protection under the Endangered Species Act. Some scientists and activists say the chances are slim but the action is long overdue.
 

AFP/Getty Images
June 29, 2016 | NPR · It’s a disfiguring disease spread by the bite of sand flies. And there are fears that the Syrian refugee problem is triggering a dramatic increase in cases.
 

Arts & Life

June 29, 2016 | NPR · It’s not hard to parse the two main influences on Robert Kroese’s new novel, The Big Sheep: Philip K. Dick and Raymond Chandler. But Kroese’s knack for humor helps elevate their gonzo grimness.
 

June 28, 2016 | NPR · It seems everyone has one: the eccentric relative much gossiped about. For Walter Shapiro, it’s his great-uncle, Freeman Bernstein. The vaudeville manager, boxing promoter, card shark and stock swindler managed to scam the Third Reich. Shapiro writes about this in his new book, Hustling Hitler.
 

June 28, 2016 | NPR · NPR’s Ari Shapiro talks with Stuart Stevens, a former strategist for Mitt Romney, whose new novel, The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear, tells the story of a neck-and-neck Republican primary campaign that ends up at a brokered convention.
 

Music

Courtesy Of The Artist
June 29, 2016 | NPR · In a video shot like a ’70s horror movie, Olsen shares a new song from the forthcoming My Woman.
 

Courtesy of the artists
June 29, 2016 | NPR · All Songs Considered asked you to share your favorite new artist of the first half of 2016. Here’s your top 10.
 

June 29, 2016 | NPR · Amjad Sabri was gunned down on Wednesday in Karachi, Pakistan. He was famous for Qawwali tradition and came from one of South Asia’s most celebrated singing families.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab