One of the most beautiful towns in Southern Colorado is undoutedly San Luis. Though it’s situated at 8,000 feet in high desert, the acequias (traditional water canals, which we’ll feature in our August episode of Western Skies) keep it a lush green in summer, which provides stark contrast to the arid hills above. Those contrasts make a perfect setting for San Luis artist Huberto Maestas’ Stations of the Cross sculptures, which line a trail up La Mesa de la Piedad y de la Misericordia to La Capilla de Todos los Santos.

 

5 Responses to The Stations of the Cross in San Luis

  1. Aubrey Fennewald says:

    It is a site to see. The town, the Valley, the Stations of the Cross climbing up the steep hillside… all beautiful in their own way. With another teacher/good friend, I took a group of 3rd and 4th graders there about ten years ago for a four-day long, overnight service-learning trip of Colorado History. Among other things, we wanted the students to understand Colorado’s heritage of Spanish settlers and traditional acacia farming, so prevalent in that area. The students were wonderful and the trip, fortunately, was quite a success. Thank you for sharing this and reminding me of that trip with those students!

  2. Sarah says:

    Wonderful slide show! Now want to visit the place in person to see the scuptures and what looks like a wonderful landscape. Thanks for sharing this.

  3. Nico says:

    Gorgeous!

  4. Mary H says:

    A catholic all my life, I have always found the stations to be shocking and sad. I have to say though, there is something deeply moving about these life-sized figures that seems to carry me past imagination. Even if not a Catholic or even a christian, anyone can grieve for the capacity for man’s cruelty to each other, can rise to our compassion for each other, and sympathize with a mother’s grief for her son through these images.

  5. suesun says:

    I second Mary’s comment. For me, it was a wonderful opportunity for my boys to learn the story of Jesus, since they haven’t had much traditional religious instruction. Each sculpture also contains a Bible verse or two. If you’re traveling through San Luis, it’s definitely worth taking the time to wander up the hill. Noel-did you ever find out what the little blue stones were for?

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