Each summer a particular refreshment seems to mysteriously make its way from our subsconscious toward our frontal lobes to become the mascot drink of the summer. Last year it was rosemary lemonade with Manitou spring water. This summer it’s Key Lime Mango Lassi (all due credit to my wife and the ready abundance of cheap mangoes). It’s preparation is exceedingly simple and requires the following ingredients:

-2 Mangoes (medium ripe/semi-firm if you like it tart, ripe/soft if you like it sweet)
-16 oz. (half of a large container) of plain yogurt (we like whole milk yogurt with the cream on top, but nonfat will do just as well)
-1/4 cup of cane sugar (or not, depending on how sweet you like it).
-1/4 cup key lime juice
-6 ice cubes
-milk or water to thin it to your preference, or not.

Choosing the right mango is definitely an acquired skill. It’s good to try a few different hardnesses to see what flavor you like. We like our mango tangy, so we tend to buy a firmer fruit that has a red and green skin. When I lived in Colombia many years ago I learned that the easiest way to get at the fruit is to cut the meaty parts off the sides of the fruit beginning at the top and cutting just to the sides of the axis so as so avoid the large, flat pit in the center. Once you’ve removed those two large pieces you can score them in a grid and scoop the fruit out into the blender with a spoon. You can also salvage the remaining fruit around the pit to whatever degree of obsessive-compulsivity your personal constitution demands (kids like to gnaw the meat off the pit).

Having taken care of the hard part, add all the other ingredients and blend until the ice is as finely chopped as you like it and serve with a striped paper straw and a wedge of lime.

For the popsicle lovers, you can pour the lassi into ice cube trays or popsicle molds and freeze them for an equally delicious treat.

Enjoy!

 

3 Responses to Big Something Summer Beverage 2011: Key Lime Mango Lassi

  1. Jeremy says:

    … and don’t forget the rum.

  2. Sarah says:

    I’m about to make this for my Sam with plain soy yogurt. Excited!

  3. Sarah says:

    Sam has said “isn’t this so good?” four times. The best part is he thinks he hates mangos and I neglected to tell him that is one of the main ingredients – he thinks I made him a peach lassi. Sam also recommends dipping a slice of green apple in it.

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