In Colorado Springs, mayoral candidates make a final effort for votes (KKTV). The Colorado Springs Independent checks in with the city’s new council members. The paper also brings an account of what soldiers from Fort Carson are doing in Afghanistan (CSIndy). Local job numbers remain unfavorable, despite a report that shows hiring is on the rise nationally (KXRM). A D-49 charter school will close (Gazette). A D-11 Montessori school seeks to add 6th grade (Gazette). A Colorado Springs police officer is arrested under suspicion of child pornography (Gazette, KXRM, KRDO, KOAA, KKTV, Denver Post). Plans have changed for a bridge replacement plan at Cheyenne Canon Park (Gazette). The Old Colorado City Historical Society obtains an original map of the area (Gazette). One family’s home-buying experience becomes a lesson in methamphetamine contamination laws (Gazette).

In Pueblo, residents are being notified over a parolee who’s classified as a sexually violent predator (KRDO). Operators of an area landfill defend their policies (Chieftain). The Fremont Heritage Commission to grow to nine members (Canon City Daily Record). An architect presents a rendering of the Canon City library renovations to the Public Works committee (Canon City Daily Record). In Custer County, school board officials talk budget cuts (Wet Mountain Tribune). The Custer County sheriff reports offenses have dropped (Wet Mountain Tribune).

Disclaimer: KRCC and KRCC News make no guarantees regarding the content within these reports, however consider them part of the news and media outlets reporting on issues affecting our coverage area. The Index is not exhaustive, and is not an endorsement of any kind. * indicates subscription required.

Denver’s Red Rocks venue celebrates 100 years of shows (Denver Post).

 

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News

AP
April 21, 2015 | NPR · Michel Martin is hosting a conversation about education in New Orleans, ten years after Hurricane Katrina sparked a transformation of public schools there. Add your voice at #NOLASCHOOLS.
 

AFP/Getty Images
April 21, 2015 | NPR · Less than two years after he was removed from office by the military, an Egyptian court has sentenced former president Mohammed Morsi to 20 years in prison for the arrest and torture of protesters.
 

NPR
April 21, 2015 | HPR · In Hawaii, a battle is going on over the future of a mountaintop. Native Hawaiians say it’s sacred ground, but astronomers say it’s the best place in the world to build an 18-story telescope.
 

Arts & Life

Courtesy of HarperCollins Publishers
April 21, 2015 | NPR · In her new novel, Pleasantville, and on TV’s Empire, Locke does her best to avoid simple stories. “You do some good stuff and you do some bad stuff,” she says. “We exist in the middle.”
 

Laine Kaplan-Levenson for NPR
April 20, 2015 | NPR · Five years after the BP oil spill, the public has stopped asking whether seafood from the Gulf is safe to eat. But now there’s a supply issue, and fishermen worry about the future of their industry.
 

April 20, 2015 | NPR · “It’s not profound regret,” Morrison tells Fresh Air. “It’s just a wiping up of tiny little messes that you didn’t recognize as mess when they were going on.” Her latest book is God Help the Child.
 

Music

Peter Serling
April 20, 2015 | NPR · The composer is the second from the new-music collective Bang on a Can to win the award with a choral work. Her oratorio explores the lives of coal miners and their families a century ago.
 

Courtesy of the artist
April 20, 2015 | NPR · In a performance at Jazz at Lincoln Center, Carla Bley, George Coleman, Charles Lloyd and Joe Segal are recognized for their lifetimes of artistry and service to the music. Watch at 7:30 p.m. EDT.
 

April 20, 2015 | NPR · The winners of this year’s Pulitzer Prizes in journalism, fiction, poetry, drama, music, biography, history and nonfiction were announced Monday at Columbia University in New York.
 

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