If the list-making, common-man-loving Walt Whitman had been an artist in the 21st Century, it’s quite possible he would be Streeter Wright. We looked back at Wright’s gas rig drawings from late in 2009 on Tuesday. Now he has a new body of work (presented as his senior show at Colorado College) that, though it breaks completely from the intimate subject matter of the culture on the rigs where he worked to pay his way through college, remains faithful to the cataloging impulse of an intuitive documentarian. Taking common objects and ubiquitous images, Wright re-represents them through the process of meticulously appropriating their likenesses. In the course of collecting these objects and images, Wright internalizes them and imbues them with a longing that stops short of nostalgia.

(Warning: Some of the images in this slide show contain nudity and other adult material)


4 Responses to Taxonomy as Practice: Streeter Wright’s Inventoryism

  1. Adam DeGraff says:

    dug. gracias.

  2. Andy says:

    We humans like to categorize things and even categorize people themselves. Streeter examines things the way an alien might – without regard to the thing’s so called “value” either as a commodity or perhaps even in artistic terms. He’s “no respecter of materials”; non-hierarchical in the same way a dog can be when presented with anything remotely edible – or not. And, interestingly to me anyway, he’s ultimately pretty hard to categorize. Maybe he’s an alien.

  3. Nancy says:

    Absolutely brilliant, and what fun!!!

  4. Pam says:

    Amazing art – thanks for the wonderful slide show and narrative!!


Courtesy of Eartha M.M. White Collection, Thomas G. Carpenter Library, University of North Florida
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