If the list-making, common-man-loving Walt Whitman had been an artist in the 21st Century, it’s quite possible he would be Streeter Wright. We looked back at Wright’s gas rig drawings from late in 2009 on Tuesday. Now he has a new body of work (presented as his senior show at Colorado College) that, though it breaks completely from the intimate subject matter of the culture on the rigs where he worked to pay his way through college, remains faithful to the cataloging impulse of an intuitive documentarian. Taking common objects and ubiquitous images, Wright re-represents them through the process of meticulously appropriating their likenesses. In the course of collecting these objects and images, Wright internalizes them and imbues them with a longing that stops short of nostalgia.

(Warning: Some of the images in this slide show contain nudity and other adult material)

 

4 Responses to Taxonomy as Practice: Streeter Wright’s Inventoryism

  1. Adam DeGraff says:

    dug. gracias.

  2. Andy says:

    We humans like to categorize things and even categorize people themselves. Streeter examines things the way an alien might – without regard to the thing’s so called “value” either as a commodity or perhaps even in artistic terms. He’s “no respecter of materials”; non-hierarchical in the same way a dog can be when presented with anything remotely edible – or not. And, interestingly to me anyway, he’s ultimately pretty hard to categorize. Maybe he’s an alien.

  3. Nancy says:

    Absolutely brilliant, and what fun!!!

  4. Pam says:

    Amazing art – thanks for the wonderful slide show and narrative!!

News

AP
October 24, 2014 | NPR · New York has no time for fear-mongering and wild speculation about the spread of disease through their city. They’re too busy crafting the perfect “Ebowla” joke for Twitter.
 

AP
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Television images showed students running out of the Marysville, Wash., high school with their hands up. A local hospital said it had received four victims, three of them are in critical condition.
 

Getty Images
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Like most people in Monrovia, our correspondent is constantly washing her hands with chlorinated water. But her booted feet are drawing strange looks.
 

Arts & Life

Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures
October 24, 2014 | NPR · NPR film critic Bob Mondello reviews Listen Up Philip and Force Majeure – 2 movies, he says, with compelling lead men who are impossible to empathize with.
 

ASSOCIATED PRESS
October 24, 2014 | NPR · TLC has canceled its unscripted show Here Comes Honey Boo Boo amid allegations that June Shannon, the mother of the show’s young star, has been dating a convicted child molester.
 

October 24, 2014 | NPR · Laura Poitras’ new film isn’t artfully shaped like her other documentaries. But she captures scenes as history is being made — and it will make you look both ways when you’re on the street.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Join host Fiona Ritchie as she showcases new music from established artists and emerging talent.
 

Redferns
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Brown was one of the pioneers of R&B. In a 1993 session, she sang to host Marian McPartland’s accompaniment in “Skylark” and “Fine And Mellow.”
 

Tinnitus Photography
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Our recurring puzzler for careful listeners, this week featuring a selection of handpicked fills from Sleater-Kinney drummer Janet Weiss. Hear the drum fill (or intro) and match it to the song.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab