If the list-making, common-man-loving Walt Whitman had been an artist in the 21st Century, it’s quite possible he would be Streeter Wright. We looked back at Wright’s gas rig drawings from late in 2009 on Tuesday. Now he has a new body of work (presented as his senior show at Colorado College) that, though it breaks completely from the intimate subject matter of the culture on the rigs where he worked to pay his way through college, remains faithful to the cataloging impulse of an intuitive documentarian. Taking common objects and ubiquitous images, Wright re-represents them through the process of meticulously appropriating their likenesses. In the course of collecting these objects and images, Wright internalizes them and imbues them with a longing that stops short of nostalgia.

(Warning: Some of the images in this slide show contain nudity and other adult material)

 

4 Responses to Taxonomy as Practice: Streeter Wright’s Inventoryism

  1. Adam DeGraff says:

    dug. gracias.

  2. Andy says:

    We humans like to categorize things and even categorize people themselves. Streeter examines things the way an alien might – without regard to the thing’s so called “value” either as a commodity or perhaps even in artistic terms. He’s “no respecter of materials”; non-hierarchical in the same way a dog can be when presented with anything remotely edible – or not. And, interestingly to me anyway, he’s ultimately pretty hard to categorize. Maybe he’s an alien.

  3. Nancy says:

    Absolutely brilliant, and what fun!!!

  4. Pam says:

    Amazing art – thanks for the wonderful slide show and narrative!!

News

August 27, 2016 | KUT · At the University of Texas, it’s the first week of school under a new state law that allows concealed handguns in classes, buildings and dorms. Protesters demonstrated for and against the law.
 

August 27, 2016 | NPR · Parenting blogger Doyin Richards, mother Tammy Garnes, and professor Christopher Emdin share goals for the new school year and thoughts about homework.
 

August 27, 2016 | NPR · Lawmakers are demanding answers after the maker of an allergy treatment raised the price from about $100 per pack to about $600 per pack in seven years. Parents say they can’t afford it.
 

Arts & Life

August 27, 2016 | NPR · Nina McLemore designs clothes for powerful women: Hillary Clinton, Elizabeth Warren, Janet Yellen, Elena Kagan and others. She talks about how fashion can help women stand out in political office.
 

Mark Seliger
August 27, 2016 | NPR · In Tom Wolfe’s first book of nonfiction in 16 years, he argues that the development of speech, not evolution, has made humans what we are today — evolution, he says, applies only to animals.
 

Shigeo Anzai Courtesy of Benesse Art Site Naoshima
August 27, 2016 | NPR · The population of Naoshima has fallen to 3,000. But this year, its art will attract 800,000 tourists from around the world. “The level of our sophistication has gone up considerably,” says a resident.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
August 27, 2016 | NPR · Sir the Baptist grew up on the South Side of Chicago. NPR’s Scott Simon talks with the singer and rapper about how music became his way of picking up where his father left off.
 

Susan Sharon
August 27, 2016 | MPBN · The religious sect known as Shakers, responsible for the song “Simple Gifts” and thousands of others, is almost gone — and a non-Shaker is trying to keep the group’s musical history alive.
 

Sony Pictures Classics
August 26, 2016 | WBGO+JAZZ.org · Hear three interpretations of the musical icon: on screen, with actor and director Don Cheadle; on the page, with co-biographer Quincy Troupe; and on stage, with trumpeter Keyon Harrold.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab