With a large Libertarian contingency here, some might wonder how the ideals took root in Colorado Springs. Part of the answer may come from a New Yorker article from last year titled “Covert Operations” by Jane Mayer about Tea Party funders Charles and David Koch, now at the center of the collective bargaining debate in Wisconsin. The New Yorker article referred to a now-defunct Colorado Springs-based libertarian institution called The Freedom School whose founder, Robert LeFevre, Charles Koch greatly admired.

With the help of the Colorado College and Pikes Peak Library District Special Collections, Noel Black and Craig Richardson dug up and created this portrait of the Freedom School, which later became Rampart College.

According to the Chicago Tribune, the Rampart College campus was sold in November of 1968. Rampart College remained open in Santa Ana, California until 1975. Many thanks to Jen Newman, Mike Procell, Jeff Bieri, Vicky Gregor and Craig Richardson for lending their voices to this piece.

 

10 Responses to The Koch Brothers’ Ideological Alma Mater

  1. Nancy says:

    I suppose that long fund drive was enough to drive the KRCC staff to Lawrence Welk, oompah bands, and dancing gaily about in their lederhosen. I wish them a speedy recovery.

  2. kay johnson says:

    All roads lead back to the Springs. Even Gov. Walker from Wisconsin was born here. Yow!! Seriously though, an interesting historical catch.

  3. Louise says:

    Thanks for presenting another piece of local history and one that’s relevant to today’s events. I had no idea! Now I understand what a loss it was to our town when the “other” newspaper closed up.

  4. Bob Carnein says:

    Thanks–it’s interesting that the Mayor of Colorado Springs and the Chamber of Commerce once warned against nut cases. Oh, for the good old days. The New Yorker article is excellent.

  5. David Pohlod says:

    Just read the New Yorker article. Typical liberal trash. Publishing the Koch brothers as “…lawbreakers…” is a new low in journalistic standards for the New Yorker. I should know, I continue to maintain my 25 year subscription to the magazine. Keeps me in tune with the strategic underpinnings of the Democratic Party.

    I will resume my contributions to local public radio, once we have succeeded in de-funding NPR from federal funds. One only needs to listen to an hour of 90.7 KPFK (one of our local public radio stations) to understand why federal funding such rubbish must stop. My ears bleed when I tune in.

    David
    Oak Park, CA

  6. Louise says:

    Just read the New Yorker article. Hmm… Kochs, immensely rich beyond belief, engage in political and policy strategies to pile up even more personal riches. I can’t imagine even beginning to identify with their politics.

  7. Keith Baker says:

    This video highlights some of the reasons why I ended my flirtation with the Libertarian Party after Harry Browne died. Very few “libertarians” are true to the principles of libertarianism if they in fact know what they are – thus the easy co-option into the Tea Party.

  8. Zac Barr says:

    really well produced! good work

  9. kay johnson says:

    I got a kick out of Mr.Pohlod’s comments about the Koch Bros. article and his penitente form of I guess conservatism that has him listening to and paying for things he doesn’t like. He said he has read/paid for the New Yorker for 25 years but the best insult he can come up with is “typical liberal trash”? Even Popeye came up with “Why I oughta…..” Refund please!

  10. Barb Van Hoy says:

    Great piece on local history! Just another reason to love KRCC (and to support it as a member AND taxpayer). Thanks!

News

January 31, 2015 | NPR · The SITE Intelligence group has acquired the footage that appears to show the execution of the Japanese journalist a week after a second Japanese hostage was killed by the group.
 

January 31, 2015 | NPR · For the first time, the extremist group acknowledges its defeat earlier this week in the heavily contested Syrian border town.
 

AP
January 31, 2015 | NPR · Libya was hopeful after Moammar Gadhafi was overthrown, but today it’s a nation torn apart, with two competing governments in two different cities, each with its own parliament and military.
 

Arts & Life

January 31, 2015 | NPR · Who says a beheaded man can’t still be head of state? NPR’s Scott Simon speaks with British journalist, author and TV host Andrew Marr about his novel, Head of State.
 

January 31, 2015 | NPR · Poet Rod McKuen was loved by millions but mocked by literary critics. He died this week at age 81.
 

January 31, 2015 | NPR · Acclaimed writer Daniel Handler, a.k.a. Lemony Snickett, drew criticism last year for a racist comment at a literary event. NPR’s Scott Simon speaks with Handler about his new novel, We Are Pirates.
 

Music

Courtesy of the Revenant Archives
January 31, 2015 | NPR · Music was an afterthought for Paramount Records, a short-lived label founded by a furniture company. But in its final years, it gave vital exposure to the artists who would come to define Delta blues.
 

Courtesy of the artist
January 31, 2015 | NPR · Krall’s new album is a collection of songs she first heard on vinyl, from The Mamas & the Papas to the Eagles. She discusses getting know the originals and sharing music with her twin sons.
 

January 30, 2015 | NPR · Named after the mosquito-borne disease, LA’s band Dengue Fever combines psychedelic rock with Cambodian pop. For over a decade, the six member band have managed to stay relevant by sticking to this offbeat idea and introducing new sounds.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab