Ghost Army

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Wartime subterfuge is as old as the Trojan Horse. But during World War II, the Army created a top-secret troop of artists called the Ghost Army to use fake arsenals, sound effects and other sleights of hand to trick the Germans. One of the artists in the troop, George Vander Sluis, spent time teaching at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center in the 1940s.

The Ghost Army is also the subject of a documentary of the same name by filmmaker and author Rick Beyer (quoted in the story above). The film is due to be completed later this year and you can watch a trailer below or visit his website at ghostarmy.com.

 

3 Responses to The Ghost Army and Local Artist George Vander Sluis

  1. Jami says:

    What’s the name of the classical piece at the end of this clip?

  2. Ruth Lynne Snow says:

    I’m forwarding this to others and looking forward to the movie. Thanks for your information and help in doing this. You’re really helping preserve important history.

  3. Robert Mayer says:

    All those who served in WW2 should be remembered, and not subjected to 50 years secrecy. These brave men conducted decoy combat which often meant driving their half-tracks up to the front lines and trying to draw fire from Nazi troops. In their best act they kept Nazi troops looking the wrong way as the 9th Army crossed the Rhine on 3/25/45. The CO of the 9th Army, reccommended them for the Unit Citation for saving 10,000 US lives, but since this medal was typically given to troops that incurred great causualties, it was not awarded. I’m proud my father was a part of this group

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