With the nuclear crisis in Fukushima on everyone’s mind, we remember a fire at the Rocky Flats nuclear weapons production facility just outside of Denver in 1969 that stands as one of the most horrifying near-misses in our history. As this excellent interative online gallery from the University of Colorado, recounts, enough material to build 1,000 nuclear bombs was nearly ignited after an oil rag in a glove box with plutonium shavings caught fire creating the costliest industrial accident in US history and a sobering reminder of the persistent dangers of atomic energy.

For a broad-stroke look at the entire history of Rocky Flats, the High Country News video below also serves as a good primer.

 

5 Responses to Remembering The 1969 Rocky Flats Fire

  1. drew says:

    Persistent dangers of atomic energy?

    Atomic weaponry, I think you mean. As if those weren’t self-evident enough.

  2. Noel Black says:

    I believe atomic energy is also responsible for atomic weaponry. Correct me if I’m wrong.

  3. Mary Ellen says:

    I appreciate this. Thanks.

  4. Sarah says:

    A calamity at a nuclear weapons factory would probably make a much bigger hole in ground than one producing electricity, I’m guessing? This story was very alarming!

  5. Jeff Nice says:

    alarming might not cover all the bases about this story.

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