Demonstrators gathered at the statehouse yesterday in support unions in Wisconsin (Denver Post). The Colorado Department of Transportation has launched a study on the state’s railroads (Colorado Springs Business Journal*). Army leaders from Ft. Carson held a public meeting regarding environmental concerns at the Pinon Canyon Maneuver Site (Trinidad Times-Independent).

The El Paso County Clerk and Recorders office will soon accept credit cards (Gazette). A survey shows residents of El Paso County want more public transportation (CSBJ).

Colorado Springs mayoral candidates debated last night (Gazette, KOAA). Council approves a plan to open the Manitou Incline to hikers (Gazette).

Pueblo West property owners face eminent domain over the planned Southern Delivery System pipeline (Chieftain).

The Pueblo Planning and Zoning Commission approves a proposal aimed at creating a clean energy park, which include a nuclear power plant (Chieftain, KKTV, KRDO). Pueblo City Council members disagree over how to help fund area non-profits (Chieftain).

Falcon School District 49 is expected to name an interim CEO today (KRDO).

A coalition in Trinidad comes together to improve the Purgatoire River through the city (Times-Independent).

Residents of Bent County speak out against the proposed closure of the Fort Lyon prison, which is part of Governor Hickenlooper’s budget plan (LaJunta Tribune Democrat).

Disclaimer: KRCC and KRCC News make no guarantees regarding the content within these reports, however consider them part of the news and media outlets reporting on issues affecting our coverage area. The Index is not exhaustive, and is not an endorsement of any kind. * indicates subscription required.

 

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News

Reuters /Landov
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Peru's Ministry of Culture
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Getty Images
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Arts & Life

AP
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Doubleday
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Riverhead
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Music

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NPR Starff
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