The High Country News takes a look at President Obama’s record on environmental issues in the west*. Snow returns to the Front Range (Gazette). Challenges face John Salazar, Governor Hickenlooper’s choice to direct the state Agriculture Department (Chieftain).

In Colorado Springs, the notion to examine the city’s pension obligations fails to gain traction (Gazette). Congressman Doug Lamborn (R) says those planning the area’s new VA clinic are expecting to announce a site soon and break ground this year (Gazette). Some Air Force Academy officials are defending the planned prayer luncheon (Gazette). A planned educational museum on World War II inches closer to reality (Business Journal*).

Pueblo tax revenues are falling short (Chieftain). Student leaders at CSU-Pueblo look at revising the school’s calendar (Chieftain).

Parents, officials, and more discuss changes happening in Falcon D-49 (Gazette). The San Luis Valley opens its biggest agricultural conference today (Chieftain). A proposed hydroelectric plant planned near Penrose clears committee (Chieftain).

Las Animas County sees budget cuts pay off (Trinidad Times-Independent).

Disclaimer: KRCC and KRCC News make no guarantees regarding the content within these reports, however consider them part of the news and media outlets reporting on issues affecting our coverage area. The Index is not exhaustive, and is not an endorsement of any kind. * indicates subscription required.

 

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News

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Some earlier research hinted that Ritalin and Adderall can hamper a child’s growth. But a study of adults who took the drugs as kids now suggests any such effect is only temporary.
 

Courtesy of Dave Ohlson
September 1, 2014 | NPR · The medical students were in Iquitos. They could provide much-needed surgery for the residents of this remote Peruvian town. Just one problem: They didn’t have enough patients.
 

YouTube
September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely-watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It’s sparked a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

Arts & Life

Jonathan Ring
September 1, 2014 | NPR · NPR’s Madhulika Sikka profiles Cumming, the author of thoughtful spy sagas like A Colder War. Cumming’s books provide plenty of action, but also grapple with the moral quandaries of espionage.
 

September 1, 2014 | NPR · MK Asante reads a poem composed for Morning Edition titled, “In Summer.” The Baltimore-based writer says it is in tribute to Paul Laurence Dunbar, an African-American poet.
 

NPR
September 1, 2014 | NPR · And, author Kwei Quartey adds, “The police may not find you for a little while.” That’s why he chose to set his second Detective Inspector Dawson book in Ghana’s capital.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
August 31, 2014 | NPR · After a three-year hiatus, the singer’s 14th album is the sound of a once-prolific genius who’s only recently relearned what it’s like to walk on steady footing.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 31, 2014 | NPR · On his 11th album, the Massive Attack star still showcases a brooding, searching spirit and a cinematic sense of atmosphere. But he also plays around with new facets of his persona.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 31, 2014 | NPR · Madman shows Rowe mixing his folk and junk-shop rock styles together with new elements: soul, blues, gospel, R&B. The upshot, surprisingly, is his most coherent record yet.
 

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