(This slide show contains images from the time of the opening on the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center and images of art and articles from The Fine Art Center School’s heyday in the 1930s and 40s under Boardman Robinson. Thanks to Blake Wilson for the Life magazines and all those noted in the captions for the images.)

On April 20, 2011, The Fine Arts Center will mark its 75th anniversary. When it opened in 1936, it was considered the finest arts institution west of the Mississippi and had a world-class, week-long gala that featured some of the most avant-garde art known to the world at that time. Craig Richardson and Noel Black of The Big Something bring us this account of the opening, written by art historian Stanley Cuba. Below you can see videos about the Erik Satie symphonic drama “Socrate” with a stage set by Alexander Calder and a video of Martha Graham’s famous 1930 work “Lamentation,” which was performed on The Fine Arts Center’s Stage when the building opened.

Download, or listen to the piece here:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

4 Responses to The Fine Arts Center's Opening and School, Our Forgotten Art History Part II

  1. adam degraff says:

    Magafan, Mangravite and Musick. All new to me and memorable. Really captures a spirit. Probably the best Calder I’ve seen (except for the circus thing) and the Martha Graham was gorgeous, especially with the introduction. Colorado Springs is shaping up. Thank you.

  2. Louise C says:

    Wow! And Colorado Springs at the time was a burg of 30,000. Now we’re more than 10 times as big. Was 1936 our high point on the arts timeline?

  3. Mary Ellen says:

    This is marvelous. Thank you! I didn’t know about Adolf Dehn or all the other remarkable artists included here. Great job.

  4. Noel Black says:

    @Louise C, we definitely had the right idea back in the first half of the 20th C. All that culture is still here in many ways, but it has been neglected. Hopefully locals who care will spread the word and help rekindle interest, which would almost certainly help inform the present and future of our arts community for the better.

News

AP
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Within hours of a government announcement last week that a truce had been signed and the release of more than 200 schoolgirls secured, another 25 were kidnapped by Boko Haram extremists.
 

EPA/Landov
October 24, 2014 | NPR · The toddler was reportedly brought by her grandmother from neighboring Guinea, where the epidemic is raging.
 

Alison Bruzek/NPR
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Shirley Corriher, author of Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking, has tips on taking the bitter bite out of coffee, and holding onto cabbage’s red hue while it’s in the pan.
 

Arts & Life

Other Press
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Reporter Giuseppe di Piazza’s debut novel, The Four Corners of Palermo, follows an unnamed young reporter during the brutal early days of the mafia’s conflict with the Italian government in the 1980s.
 

Thomas Dunne Books
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Historian Peter Ackroyd’s new book surveys the history of England from the end of the Tudor era to the Glorious Revolution of 1688 — almost a century of war, debate and transformation.
 

October 24, 2014 | NPR · Ken Turan reviews the documentary Citizenfour from filmmaker Laura Poitras about Edward Snowden and his decision to leak information about the National Security Agency’s surveillance activities.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 24, 2014 | NPR · Recorded with Liz Harris’ voice, a piano and not much else, Ruins achieves striking intimacy, its emotional heft commanding attention throughout.
 

October 24, 2014 | NPR · NPR TV critic Eric Deggans looks at the new documentary, Mr. Dynamite: The Rise of James Brown, featuring rare and never-before-seen footage. The film premieres on HBO Monday.
 

Getty Images
October 23, 2014 | NPR · The mockingbird is known for latching on to sounds and repeating them. But in the case of a certain four-note phrase New Orleans musicians use to communicate, the bird may be the original artist.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab