Steven Hayward Reads from his novel “Don’t Be Afraid”

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Steven Hayward Interview at KRCC

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Until digital devices compress all novels into the ALLNOVEL, enabling such devices to instantly create the novel you want to read from an algorithm based on your DNA, credit card information and Safeway discount card (a few weeks from now, we’ve heard), people will probably continue to write novels. Steven Hayward, Associate Professor of Literature at Colorado College, is such a person. He has written three books: Buddha Stevens: and Other Stories, The Secret Mitzvah of Lucio Burke, and his latest, Don’t Be Afraid, which tells the story of of 17-year-old Jim Morrisson of Cleveland Heights, Ohio whose life becomes stunted in the wake of his brother’s freak death in a library explosion. Blending satire, amateur detective fiction and family drama for a rare blend only a Canadian could imagine, Hayward’s novel is currently number 9 on the best-seller list in Canada.

It won’t be released in the U.S. until next year, but lucky for us he reads an excerpt and talks about novel writing below. Plus, you can hear him read tomorrow night (Thurs, Feb. 24) in the Gates Common Room on the Colorado College Campus (on the second floor of Palmer Hall just to the east of Tutt Library) at 7 p.m.

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