What began as a simple slide show examining the iconic Colorado Springs photo-op of Pikes Peak Avenue looking west toward the Antlers Hotel over the years quickly turned into an exploration of the history of the hotel itself. With Marshall Sprague’s Newport in the Rockies as our historical compass, and images from the Pikes Peak Library District and the Denver Public Library as our material guides, we present this brief history of the Antlers Hotel including its various births and deaths from 1883 to present as seen from Pikes Peak Avenue.

 

9 Responses to Westward Hotel! A Brief History of the Antlers

  1. Tim Leigh says:

    I appreciate seeing this information; as a candidate for city council, one of my downtown development ideas is the re-invigoration of Pikes Peak Avenue, from Nevada Avenue to Cascade Avenue. My vision is to make Pikes Peak into a walking mall which would be anchored on each end; on the east by the new Mining Exchange Hotel and on the west, the Antlers.

    This was a nice piece; congratulations.

  2. Joyce Cheney says:

    Good choice of music at the end. ‘Ain’t it the truth?

  3. Tony Wolusky says:

    Thanks for this history of what I had always considered a rather mediocre hotel. It once was fabulous.

  4. Bettina Swigger says:

    Wow. Well done.

  5. Sarah Mi\teer says:

    Fabulous! Really enjoyed this presentation. The Big Something is such a wonderful way to start the day!

  6. Mike Procell says:

    Checkout time for the old classic Antlers structure was way too soon and early.

  7. Betty Armstrong says:

    Nicely done piece of history. Too bad we’re stuck with least interesting period of architecture for The Antlers!

  8. Jeremy Van Hoy says:

    There are many ways to screw the pooch…

  9. [...] including its various births and deaths from 1883 to present as seen from Pikes Peak Avenue.Click HERE for more.Number 1 (tie):Our Lost Libertarian History: The Freedom School and Rampart College With a [...]

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