(“Colorado-Remarkable Meterological Display Observed at Chrisman” by M. Doolittle, January 1887. Courtesy of Special Collections, Pikes Peak Library District. Image Number: 257-6307.)

The Middle Distance 12.24.10: “Full Moon”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

photo by Sean Cayton

On Tuesday, December 21, my students came to class sleepy-eyed and dazed. Many of them had stretched out on one of the wide lawns of the Colorado College campus the night before and looked skyward as the earth cast its big shadow across the full moon, obstructing its light and turning the orb a glowing reddish brown. The solstice lunar eclipse was a night to remember.

“It was so beautiful,” they cooed, their eyes still glittering with the freshness of that unique shared experience.

I had casually accepted the weatherman’s prediction that there would be cloud cover, and slept through the event. For three and a half years now, I have dreaded and avoided full moons.

My son died on a full moon night in late July, 2007, and of all the images of that terrifying passage of time — stopped, slowed, rushed, distorted —what I remember most clearly is the sight of the round, glowing moon out the car window as we drove away from the ruined site of his passing. It seemed as if the moon hovered over us, moving across the silent 3 a.m. streets like a spotlight.

Years before, when my three sons were second and fourth graders and I was a busy newspaper editor, I had rushed home from work one winter night to witness the lunar eclipse with them. It was cold and I fed them a quick dinner of hamburgers before we reclined on the back lawn for their special homework assignment. We spread out quilts and lay side by side singing every moon song we could think of, waiting for the creeping shadow to begin blocking out the full moon’s light. My oldest boy, the one whose absence now colors our Christmases, kept running back into the house to collect more blankets, sleeping bags, and pillows. He covered us and tucked us in against the cold sky and the gradually darkening moon. He was a nester and this was one of his greatest pleasures.

After he died, I couldn’t find a way to let the full moon in, to let it lift my heart. When it appeared, I glanced at it cautiously, then looked away. My friends wrote me kind notes from Maine and Colorado, where they sat in their back yards, watching the full moon and thinking of my son while I took cover in South Texas, avoiding the sight of the moon’s reflection on the gentle waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

But this Christmas, the universe has granted me an immeasurable gift, I can look at the full moon again and feel joy. My students gave it back to me with their starry eyes and glowing faces. The clerk at the local coffee shop gave it back to me when he pontificated over the eclipse.

“Dude, it’s not going to happen again for, like 450 years!” he told a co-worker.

It happened last night as I was driving through the narrow, wooded streets of my neighborhood. To the east, the sky glowed. My first thought was that a house was on fire, someone’s house burning, just before Christmas. But when I crested a hill and the trees parted, I saw the magnificent rising full moon, it’s face carved, its outline shimmering against the black winter sky. I pulled over to look at it longer, and to catch the breath it had stolen from me.

All around, the houses and yards glittered with Christmas lights, and atop one house, a star. I thought of the passage in Matthew, the story of the star that guided the Wise Men, a story that had always thrilled me when I was a kid waiting for Christmas:

“… and, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was. When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.”

Looking into the face of the full moon again has let me remember my boy, the nester, who wrapped us in soft layers and bundled up and lay down beside us to witness the miracle of the eclipse. This Christmas, the full moon is a beacon of beauty that gives me hope. Whenever its light is obscured, whether by a passing cloud, or on rare occasions, by the enormous shadow of the revolving earth, it is still there and will always return.

Kathryn Eastburn is the author of A Sacred Feaest: Reflections of Sacred Harp Singing and Dinner on the Ground, and Simon Says: A True Story of Boys and Murder in the Rocky Mountain West. You can comment and read or listen to this column again at The Big Something at KRCC.org. “The Middle Distance” is published every Friday on The Big Something and airs each Saturday at 1 p.m. right after This American Life.

Tagged with:
 

5 Responses to The Middle Distance 12/24/10: "Full Moon"

  1. Rose Enyeart says:

    Loved it and wept. Hope and eternal life keeps us moving and loving. Life never ends and neither does love. I love the moon. My grandma was Luna and I always thought she came from a place were she shone and peace prevailed.

  2. Libby says:

    A precious Christmas Eve gift to all your readers, Kathryn. I thank you and wish continued healing, hope, love and joy to you and family. Your writings always bring poetry to mind: “Hope is the thing with feathers…and never stops at all” and “God gave us roses that we may have memories in December”. Best, Libby

  3. Libby says:

    A correction from the frazzled: I believe the quote is “God gave us memories that we may have roses in December”. Best to all, Libby

  4. Lenore Fleck says:

    I don’t doubt there are many mothers who hear the passage in Matthew and think of their own little one, born with good tidings of great joy.
    When I visited Machu Picchu, I was greatly moved by the setting. The city had been painstakingly laid out so that the entire site and surrounding geography formed an enormous calendar. Position of the sun and shadows cast would tell of the solstices and other important dates for planting and ceremonies. I realized that if I had lived there, I could always remember the birth date of my child by where the sun rose over the jagged mountains across the valley. Each year, the sun would return in its course to remind me.

  5. Liz Arnold says:

    Kathryn, thank you for calling my attention to the moon that night last week. We walked to the middle of the street and saw it framed between branches and rooflines, and it was so beautiful…a reminder…and a beacon of hope.
    I love you

News

July 28, 2014 | NPR · Calling the matter “very serious,” an Obama administration official says Russia violated the pact by testing a ground-launched cruise missile.
 

AP
July 28, 2014 | NPR · A California judge gave the green light to the sale of the team, which Donald Sterling’s estranged wife had arranged in May.
 

NPR
July 28, 2014 | NPR · For this week’s Sandwich Monday, we try a sandwich with a cult following. It’s the Korean steak from Rhea’s Market and Deli in San Francisco.
 

Arts & Life

NPR
July 28, 2014 | NPR · For this week’s Sandwich Monday, we try a sandwich with a cult following. It’s the Korean steak from Rhea’s Market and Deli in San Francisco.
 

July 28, 2014 | NPR · Alan Cheuse reviews A Replacement Life, Boris Fishman’s humorous account of Holocaust survivors in today’s New York.
 

July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
July 28, 2014 | NPR · His style may be his own, but it distinctly recalls the sound of the 1950s. The vocalist, guitarist and songwriter shares his love of 45 rpm records and raw, live rock ‘n’ roll.
 

July 28, 2014 | NPR · Jenny Lewis achieved musical fame as part of the indie band Rilo Kiley, which broke up in 2011. Her third solo album announces a new chapter in her career — and perhaps her life.
 

Courtesy of the artist
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Dave Brubeck called her “one of the greatest jazz pianists I have ever heard.” She digs up an old tune and calls two Monk numbers on this 1992 episode of the program.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab