(Slide show is best viewed in full-screen mode by clicking on the arrows in the lower right-hand corner of the player. Click the right and left arrow buttons on the lower left to move through the slides. All photos by Noel Black and Michael Myers.)

One year ago, photographer Michael Myers and I spent a cold day photographing the homeless camps along Fountain and Monument Creeks in Colorado Springs. We were interested in documenting the conflicting aesthetics of the temporary dwellings, which sheltered many homeless—a part of our community whose lives are seldom seen beyond the street corners—during last year’s bitter winter. For many people, the structures were an ugly visual reminder of the deepening recession. But there was also a careful beauty to many of the structures in the camp and an evident order to life there that spoke to the universal human need for a balance of community, privacy and dignity.

 

One Response to Looking Back at the Homeless Camps a Year Later

  1. barbara steiner says:

    ironic: America “the beautiful” park with homeless camps* before it
    *not totally ‘un-beautiful’

News

AP
October 20, 2014 | NPR · Since 2008, almost 16 million vehicles have been recalled over worries that airbags might explode if exposed to high humidity for long periods of time.
 

NPR
October 20, 2014 | NPR · When Tunisia’s young people protested in 2011, they had one key demand: jobs. Now, despite new political leadership, that demand remains unmet — even in tech, the sector that offers the most promise.
 

October 20, 2014 | NPR · Researchers call for stronger safety warnings on drugs called dopamine agonists because they can trigger self-destructive, obsessional behavior in some people.
 

Arts & Life

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
October 20, 2014 | NPR · Joel Beckerman is a composer who specializes in sonic branding. His new book is called The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms the Way We Think, Feel, and Buy.
 

iStockphoto
October 20, 2014 | NPR · When police pulled a gun on Bryan Stevenson as he was sitting quietly in his car in Atlanta, he knew he had to effect change. His memoir describes his attempts, including freeing men on death row.
 

AFP/Getty Images
October 20, 2014 | NPR · The Nobel laureate taught at Princeton University for 17 years. Now, her papers — some 180 linear feet of them — are returning to be housed in the school’s library. Also: a roundup of new releases.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 20, 2014 | NPR · The singer and activist tackles jazz standards, including “Strange Fruit” and others, on her new album. Here, she and NPR’s Steve Inskeep discuss how she connects with the present through the past.
 

NPR
October 20, 2014 | NPR · D’Amato’s new album The Shipwreck From The Shore can feel Motown-y, garage-y and Springsteen-y, and all that production serves his songs well. But here the Tiny Desk, his music is sparer.
 

Courtesy of the artist
October 20, 2014 | NPR · The pop singer and songwriter sounds more comfortable and assured on her second album, Tough Love. “This life is quite bizarre sometimes,” she tells NPR’s Audie Cornish.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab