When we heard that Roberto Agnolini, owner of Bryan & Scott Jewelers, was closing his doors after more than 50 years in downtown Colorado Springs, we went to pay our respects to the keepers of life’s finer things. An eclectic store where prices on jewelry and home decor can range from $5 to $50,000, Bryan & Scott remains as one of the last shops of its kind from a time when stores like Hibbards, Chinook, Lee’s Clothiers & The Whickerbill defined Tejon Street.

But when we arrived to document one of the store’s final days, Agnolini explained to us that, until he sells the building, it would cost him more to close down than it would to leave the doors open. And so, though he’d planned to retire on January 4, 2011, Bryan & Scott will continue to serve its clientele indefinitely until the building sells.

More like a museum than any mere “shop,” Bryan & Scott is a window into a disappearing way of life few of us will know, but all can appreciate (if not envy). In this video, Agnolini talks about how he got into the business of design and what it has meant to him over the years.

 

5 Responses to The Last Days of Bryan & Scott?

  1. Sarah says:

    I’ll be sorry to see this store close – it’s a fascinating place.

  2. Jeremy Van Hoy says:

    Since you guys are on a nostalgic bent, check out this WWII Goofy cartoon:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXguGoJTK4o

    Good stuff here!

  3. Mark says:

    i’ve walked by that store almost daily for over 30 yrs, never been in, but then I’m not into cha-chi’s or jewerly. Although I found Roberto’s final comments quite chilling. He even seemed to choke up on his own words. He was quite inciteful.

  4. Maude says:

    don’t you mean “insightful?”

  5. Milo says:

    “Everone does their own thing, which is nothing”.
    Profound, Roberto. You are so correct, one’s own thing is only one’s thing, a relative condition; I hear your sorrow. I believe it seems to be a loss of a sense of beauty.
    Beauty is seemly lost these days.
    Yet, I ponder whoes eyes are looking.
    I thank you for feeling and caring for beauty and how it relates to the soul… mine has been warmed with your store and life.
    thank you.

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