Rember 9600 bps dial-up terminals, electronic messages, graphical interfaces, the data superhighway, virtual multi-user dungeons (MUDs), and information anxiety? Well, hop aboard the public radio time machine back to 1993 before Google, iTunes and WikiLeaks when Ira Flatow hosted the very first public radio broadcast over the Internet for Science Friday.

It’s hard to believe that public radio listeners can now simply click a link to listen to almost any station across the country live, or stream old episodes of shows like this one in which Flatow asks, “Are you saying instead of having to go buy a CD, you could just download the CD on the internet?… That’s a great idea!”

If one Internet year = about 10 pre-Internet years, then 1993 was about 170 years ago and it really feels that way when you listen to this program. Amazing how much of what they wanted and predicted has come to pass.

 

One Response to Back to the Future of Radio: 1993

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