Rember 9600 bps dial-up terminals, electronic messages, graphical interfaces, the data superhighway, virtual multi-user dungeons (MUDs), and information anxiety? Well, hop aboard the public radio time machine back to 1993 before Google, iTunes and WikiLeaks when Ira Flatow hosted the very first public radio broadcast over the Internet for Science Friday.

It’s hard to believe that public radio listeners can now simply click a link to listen to almost any station across the country live, or stream old episodes of shows like this one in which Flatow asks, “Are you saying instead of having to go buy a CD, you could just download the CD on the internet?… That’s a great idea!”

If one Internet year = about 10 pre-Internet years, then 1993 was about 170 years ago and it really feels that way when you listen to this program. Amazing how much of what they wanted and predicted has come to pass.

 

One Response to Back to the Future of Radio: 1993

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Becca Sickbert, KRCC. KRCC said: Back to the Future of Radio: 1993: If one Internet year = about 10 pre-Internet years, then 1993 was about 170… http://bit.ly/eeuxee [...]

News

AP
October 22, 2014 | NPR · The St. Louis Post-Disptatch has obtained an autopsy report on the shooting of Michael Brown. It leaves a lot of questions about the shooting of the 18-year-old by Officer Darren Wilson.
 

NPR
October 22, 2014 | NPR · The dearth of water in this state is showing no signs of easing. Officials have introduced plans to revamp the water rationing and distribution systems until the rains come. If they ever come.
 

Courtesy of Trends in Parasitology, Fornace et al
October 22, 2014 | NPR · How is a rare strain of malaria spreading near cities in Southeast Asia? That’s the question that’s been puzzling a team of scientists. And they’re using drones to find the answer.
 

Arts & Life

Luma Bites
October 22, 2014 | NPR · Two entrepreneurs have developed new tricks to make food that’s literally illuminating, using ingredients that are as natural and unprocessed as possible. It’s just basic food chemistry, folks.
 

October 22, 2014 | NPR · When Gerard Russell was a diplomat in the Middle East, he met followers of ancient religions facing extinction. His new book includes the origins of the Yazidis, who are fleeing the Islamic State.
 

October 22, 2014 | NPR · Atavist Books launched with aims of upending the print-first publishing model. Now it’s announcing its plans to close. Meanwhile, partnerships between public libraries and airports are taking off.
 

Music

October 22, 2014 | NPR · Steven Ellison has built an impressive reputation among critics and fans in the know for mixing hip hop, jazz and electronica into something original. But even for the aforementioned followers, the new album from Ellison — better-known as Flying Lotus — is a surprise. It’s all about death, not as something to be mourned but as a journey to be anticipated.
 

Mountain Stage
October 22, 2014 | NPR · The West Virginia natives, both widely respected in the world of string-band music, perform live.
 

Courtesy of the artist
October 22, 2014 | WXPN · The rootsy folk-rock band formed after its singer heard a harpist through his apartment wall.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab